2018 National Trademark Exposition


Published on Sep 06, 2018

On July 27, 2018, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in collaboration with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History (NMAH) kicked off the 2018 National Trademark Exposition with keynote speaker Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. NMAH Interim Director Sue Fruchter welcomed the attendees to the Exposition. Commissioner for Trademarks Mary Boney Denison thanked the Exposition’s twenty-plus exhibitors. USPTO Director Andrei Iancu explained that intellectual property is often considered the most valuable asset of a business.



Download a Printable Transcript

Other ways to view this video
Watch it on YouTube



1
00:00:04,004 --> 00:00:07,074
(Applause) >> SUSAN FRUCHTER:
Good afternoon and welcome to the

2
00:00:07,074 --> 00:00:09,676
National Trademark Exposition.

3
00:00:09,676 --> 00:00:13,046
I am Sue Fruchter and I have
the privilege to serve as interim

4
00:00:13,046 --> 00:00:17,017
director of your National
Museum of American History.

5
00:00:17,017 --> 00:00:20,454
The most visited
history museum in the world.

6
00:00:20,454 --> 00:00:24,057
We're honored to welcome so many
distinguished guests

7
00:00:24,057 --> 00:00:27,895
including the Undersecretary of
Commerce for Intellectual

8
00:00:27,895 --> 00:00:29,396
Property and Director
of the U.S.

9
00:00:29,396 --> 00:00:32,766
Patent and Trademark
Office Andrei Iancu.

10
00:00:32,766 --> 00:00:42,142
(Applause) >> SUE FRUCHTER:
Commissioner for Trademarks,

11
00:00:42,142 --> 00:00:42,843
Mary Denison.

12
00:00:42,843 --> 00:00:50,584
(Applause) >> SUE FRUCHTER: And
renowned advocate and lover of

13
00:00:50,584 --> 00:00:54,054
history, author, commentator
and basketball legend

14
00:00:54,054 --> 00:01:01,295
Kareem Abdul‑Jabbar.(Applause)

15
00:01:01,295 --> 00:01:04,197
>> SUE FRUCHTER: We thank the
entire team from the trademark

16
00:01:04,197 --> 00:01:09,303
office and our Lemelson Center
for the Study of Invention and
Innovation lead by

17
00:01:09,303 --> 00:01:12,806
Arthur Daemmrich for
this exciting program.

18
00:01:12,806 --> 00:01:15,876
We're appreciative to the
American Intellectual Property

19
00:01:15,876 --> 00:01:17,644
Law Association and

20
00:01:17,644 --> 00:01:20,514
the International Trademark
Association for their

21
00:01:20,514 --> 00:01:22,449
generous support.

22
00:01:22,449 --> 00:01:27,321
We are thrilled to host this two‑day
program in collaboration with the

23
00:01:27,321 --> 00:01:31,692
U.S Patent and Trademark Office
including over 20 displays for

24
00:01:31,692 --> 00:01:38,598
dynamic and innovative
companies and government agencies.

25
00:01:38,598 --> 00:01:42,436
In addition to enjoying the panel
discussions, please walk around and

26
00:01:42,436 --> 00:01:47,040
see the displays, invent new
products and design and find out how

27
00:01:47,040 --> 00:01:51,645
to strengthen your own
trademark in the activity zone.

28
00:01:51,645 --> 00:01:56,750
This trademark exposition celebrates
a foundational American pillar that

29
00:01:56,750 --> 00:02:01,655
flows through our history protecting
innovation and stimulating new

30
00:02:01,655 --> 00:02:04,524
consumer products and services.

31
00:02:04,524 --> 00:02:08,395
Our founders understood the
value of protecting innovation and

32
00:02:08,395 --> 00:02:10,831
encouraging new ideas.

33
00:02:10,831 --> 00:02:15,302
While trademarks came under formal
protection in the late 19th century,

34
00:02:15,302 --> 00:02:20,040
our collection of 18th century
Paul Revere silverware is a

35
00:02:20,040 --> 00:02:22,843
wonderful demonstration of how
Americans

36
00:02:22,843 --> 00:02:25,979
have used marking from our
earliest days

37
00:02:25,979 --> 00:02:30,317
distinguish the quality of their
products from their competitors.

38
00:02:30,317 --> 00:02:34,121
And today, as many of you are
working to develop our own personal

39
00:02:34,121 --> 00:02:38,792
brand and new inventions, there's
much to learn from this program and

40
00:02:38,792 --> 00:02:41,261
from our exhibitions.

41
00:02:41,261 --> 00:02:45,198
Here at the national museum we
share and preserve a collection of

42
00:02:45,198 --> 00:02:50,570
national treasures on behalf of the
American people and indeed the world

43
00:02:50,570 --> 00:02:55,108
to help us make sense of the present
and most importantly shape a more

44
00:02:55,108 --> 00:02:57,444
humane future.

45
00:02:57,444 --> 00:03:02,416
History matters because it helps us
understand where we have come from

46
00:03:02,416 --> 00:03:04,951
and opens opportunities for
discussing and taking action

47
00:03:04,951 --> 00:03:07,554
for the future.

48
00:03:07,554 --> 00:03:11,458
So we are working to bring the
nation together around fundamental

49
00:03:11,458 --> 00:03:17,964
American ideals and ideas like
democracy, opportunity, and freedom.

50
00:03:17,964 --> 00:03:20,801
And of course invention and
innovation,

51
00:03:20,801 --> 00:03:24,104
which join us as a people.

52
00:03:24,104 --> 00:03:29,009
To realize this ambitious vision we
are in the midst of a 20‑year $600

53
00:03:29,009 --> 00:03:34,548
million complete reinvention
of every facet of this museum.

54
00:03:34,548 --> 00:03:38,685
Our invention and innovation
wing which surrounds us today was

55
00:03:38,685 --> 00:03:42,022
renovated and reopened in 2015.

56
00:03:42,022 --> 00:03:45,859
It showcases stories about
diverse inventors,

57
00:03:45,859 --> 00:03:49,596
broadens definitions of who
inventors are and demonstrates

58
00:03:49,596 --> 00:03:53,366
that innovation is
a process built around testing,

59
00:03:53,366 --> 00:03:58,305
tweaking and bringing new
products and services to the public.

60
00:03:58,305 --> 00:04:02,976
Innovation and business are infused
into every component of this floor

61
00:04:02,976 --> 00:04:07,481
from igniting young minds in spark
lab over to your left where school

62
00:04:07,481 --> 00:04:13,186
aged children become inventors by
fusing science and engineering with

63
00:04:13,186 --> 00:04:18,325
history, art, and creativity to show
casing the importance of American

64
00:04:18,325 --> 00:04:22,662
inventors in American
enterprise, the Smithsonian's

65
00:04:22,662 --> 00:04:27,300
first exhibition on the history
of American business, which

66
00:04:27,300 --> 00:04:31,771
emphasizes the connections among
inventors, entrepreneurs and

67
00:04:31,771 --> 00:04:38,778
consumers that fostered growth
over the past 200 years.

68
00:04:38,778 --> 00:04:43,583
Over the next ten years as we work
to transform the museum, we will be

69
00:04:43,583 --> 00:04:49,523
opening new exhibitions on science,
medicine, entertainment, culture,

70
00:04:49,523 --> 00:04:53,260
and so many other
fundamental American themes.

71
00:04:53,260 --> 00:04:58,698
We are weaving the American spirit
of innovation into all of these

72
00:04:58,698 --> 00:05:03,837
projects of vital importance
to an ever evolving nation

73
00:05:03,837 --> 00:05:07,140
facing change among the horizon.

74
00:05:07,140 --> 00:05:10,343
It's my pleasure to introduce a
dear friend of the

75
00:05:10,343 --> 00:05:12,612
National Museum of American
History,

76
00:05:12,612 --> 00:05:15,549
Mary Denison, the
Commissioner of Tradmearks for


77
00:05:15,549 --> 00:05:18,318
the U.S. Patent and Trademark
Office.

78
00:05:18,318 --> 00:05:21,955
Mary leads all aspects of
the trademark organization.

79
00:05:21,955 --> 00:05:25,959
She is known for her outreach to
the trademark legal community, small

80
00:05:25,959 --> 00:05:30,330
businesses, and for making the
trademark process more accessible to

81
00:05:30,330 --> 00:05:32,699
start‑ups and innovators.

82
00:05:32,699 --> 00:05:35,235
She has served as a member of
the Board of Directors of the

83
00:05:35,235 --> 00:05:37,871
International Trademark
Association and

84
00:05:37,871 --> 00:05:40,040
holds degrees from
Duke University

85
00:05:40,040 --> 00:05:43,076
and University of
North Carolina school of law.

86
00:05:43,076 --> 00:05:45,045
Mary, welcome, and thank you
again for your

87
00:05:45,045 --> 00:05:53,053
friendship and collaboration.
(Applause)

88
00:05:53,053 --> 00:05:54,788
>> MARY BONEY DENISON:
Thank you so much, Sue, for that

89
00:05:54,788 --> 00:05:55,722
kind introduction.

90
00:05:55,722 --> 00:05:59,960
And afternoon everyone,
including those watching remotely.

91
00:05:59,960 --> 00:06:00,627
Welcome.

92
00:06:00,627 --> 00:06:05,899
We are so excited that the national
trademark exhibition is being held

93
00:06:05,899 --> 00:06:08,969
here at the Smithsonian National
Museum of American History

94
00:06:08,969 --> 00:06:11,338
for the first time.

95
00:06:11,338 --> 00:06:14,741
A big thank you to the Smithsonian
for collaborating with us on this

96
00:06:14,741 --> 00:06:17,577
important event.

97
00:06:17,577 --> 00:06:23,116
I saw a recent article that the
average consumer is exposed to up to

98
00:06:23,116 --> 00:06:26,720
10,000 brand messages every day.

99
00:06:26,720 --> 00:06:28,688
10,000.

100
00:06:28,688 --> 00:06:29,990
Amazing.

101
00:06:29,990 --> 00:06:32,392
How many brands are
you wearing right now?

102
00:06:32,392 --> 00:06:33,893
I have on at least five.

103
00:06:33,893 --> 00:06:36,596
You probably do too.

104
00:06:36,596 --> 00:06:40,500
Most people are not even aware of
the multitude of advertisements they

105
00:06:40,500 --> 00:06:43,703
see or hear all the time and
the trademarks behind them.

106
00:06:43,703 --> 00:06:48,575
And studies have shown that kids as
young as two can recognize most of

107
00:06:48,575 --> 00:06:52,746
the popular brand logos such as
the McDonald's golden arches or the

108
00:06:52,746 --> 00:06:57,484
logos for Pepsi or
Starbucks or Target.

109
00:06:57,484 --> 00:07:00,420
Take a look at this video.

110
00:07:05,225 --> 00:07:09,129
>> Looks like there's a doughnut.

111
00:07:09,129 --> 00:07:14,734
Doughnuts.

112
00:07:14,734 --> 00:07:16,236
>> Take a guess what do you think
a company like that would make?

113
00:07:16,236 --> 00:07:19,873
>> Bow ties.

114
00:07:19,873 --> 00:07:24,377
>> It's coffee.

115
00:07:24,377 --> 00:07:27,580
>> My dad gets coffee there a lot.

116
00:07:27,580 --> 00:07:30,116
>> Mets.

117
00:07:30,116 --> 00:07:31,785
>> That says I love New York.

118
00:07:31,785 --> 00:07:32,886
Where do you live?

119
00:07:32,886 --> 00:07:36,089
>> At my house.

120
00:07:36,089 --> 00:07:41,461
>> On the mother's
and farther's laptop.

121
00:07:41,461 --> 00:07:43,563
>> Yankees.

122
00:07:43,563 --> 00:07:48,301
>> That's the type of brand my
dad smokes, a cigarette brand.

123
00:07:48,301 --> 00:07:55,542
>> This is for French fries.

124
00:07:55,542 --> 00:07:58,378
>> Isn't that fabulous?

125
00:07:58,378 --> 00:08:01,481
I still remember taking my daughter
to an antique show when she was

126
00:08:01,481 --> 00:08:06,319
about 18 months old and she saw
the Visa logo and she said Visa.

127
00:08:06,319 --> 00:08:07,387
I almost fell on the floor.

128
00:08:07,387 --> 00:08:12,826
I shouldn't be surprised because my
Visa card does get a lot of work.

129
00:08:12,826 --> 00:08:14,627
An important part of
the mission of the U.S.

130
00:08:14,627 --> 00:08:18,365
Patent and Trademark Office
is education and outreach.

131
00:08:18,365 --> 00:08:23,636
This venue, being a place of fun
learning right on the national mall

132
00:08:23,636 --> 00:08:26,439
certainly aligns with those goals.

133
00:08:26,439 --> 00:08:30,710
Today is a fun day for you and
your kids to brand a sneaker, to

134
00:08:30,710 --> 00:08:34,748
participate in a scavenger hunt for
trademarks or learn what a trademark

135
00:08:34,748 --> 00:08:36,516
grave yard is.

136
00:08:36,516 --> 00:08:40,186
In addition, after you learn about
trademarks, we suggest you head over

137
00:08:40,186 --> 00:08:44,424
and check out the museum's exhibits
particularly the draper spark lab

138
00:08:44,424 --> 00:08:48,061
where visitors can become inventors.

139
00:08:48,061 --> 00:08:52,999
We hope each of you will learn more
about the importance of trademarks

140
00:08:52,999 --> 00:08:56,136
to the economy as well as
your own personal lives.

141
00:08:56,136 --> 00:08:59,572
In addition to being vital to the
economy, trademarks are everywhere

142
00:08:59,572 --> 00:09:01,875
and they are fun.

143
00:09:01,875 --> 00:09:05,045
This year we're welcoming 20
exhibiters to teach you about their

144
00:09:05,045 --> 00:09:07,847
brands and the
importance of trademarks.

145
00:09:07,847 --> 00:09:11,251
We have 1,000 Crain's LLC,


146
00:09:11,251 --> 00:09:14,487
American Intellectual
Property Law Association

147
00:09:14,487 --> 00:09:16,990
DC Roller Girls,


148
00:09:16,990 --> 00:09:21,661
Edible IP LLC, DBA
Edible Arrangements,

149
00:09:21,661 --> 00:09:24,297
Girl Scouts Nations Capitol

150
00:09:24,297 --> 00:09:27,901
Global Brand Council
U.S. Chamber of Commerce,

151
00:09:27,901 --> 00:09:33,973
International Trademark
Association, Lucia's Labs,

152
00:09:33,973 --> 00:09:40,413
LLC, Microsoft, NASA Goddard Space
Flight Center, National Park Service

153
00:09:40,413 --> 00:09:47,187
and National Park Foundation,
Numbers Alive, Politics and Pros,

154
00:09:47,187 --> 00:09:54,861
Safeway, Segue, Inc., Tenneco
Automotive, the National Institute

155
00:09:54,861 --> 00:09:59,599
on Deafness and Other Communication
Disorders, Under Armour, Inc.,

156
00:09:59,599 --> 00:10:03,403
Velcro Companies and YMCA.

157
00:10:03,403 --> 00:10:07,373
Many of these exhibiters have
brands that you probably recognize.

158
00:10:07,373 --> 00:10:11,144
But there are also some newer
fun brands for you to get to know.

159
00:10:11,144 --> 00:10:15,181
You'll see the importance of
trademarks in every line of work.

160
00:10:15,181 --> 00:10:18,384
We also hope that you'll check
out our USPTO booth which has

161
00:10:18,384 --> 00:10:22,222
information on the important role
that trademarks play for businesses

162
00:10:22,222 --> 00:10:25,091
plus materials to help you to
learn more about the trademark

163
00:10:25,091 --> 00:10:29,662
registration process.
In closing I want to thank

164
00:10:29,662 --> 00:10:33,266
Shana Webster Trotman and
Chrisie Brightmire King who

165
00:10:33,266 --> 00:10:38,705
led the 2018 National Trademark
Exposition for our agency

166
00:10:38,705 --> 00:10:41,341
together with Arthur Daemmrich
for the Smithsonian.

167
00:10:41,341 --> 00:10:45,178
They have worked so hard to make
this fantastic event happen.

168
00:10:45,178 --> 00:10:47,147
Let's give them a
big round of applause.

169
00:10:47,147 --> 00:10:56,689
(Applause) >> MARY BONEY DENISON:
Now I have the honor of introducing

170
00:10:56,689 --> 00:11:00,293
USPTO Director Andrei Iancu.

171
00:11:00,293 --> 00:11:02,762
Andrei Iancu is the
Undersecretary of Commerce for

172
00:11:02,762 --> 00:11:05,098
Intellectual Property and
Director of the U.S.

173
00:11:05,098 --> 00:11:06,766
Patent and Trademark Office.

174
00:11:06,766 --> 00:11:10,336
In this role he provides leadership
and oversight to one of the largest

175
00:11:10,336 --> 00:11:15,742
intellectual property offices in the
world with over 13,000 employees and

176
00:11:15,742 --> 00:11:17,977
an annual budget of over $3 billion.

177
00:11:17,977 --> 00:11:23,283
He also serves as the principal
advisor to the Secretary of
Commerce

178
00:11:23,283 --> 00:11:27,186
on domestic and international
intellectual property matters.

179
00:11:27,186 --> 00:11:31,057
Before joining the USPTO, Mr.
Iancu was the managing partner

180
00:11:31,057 --> 00:11:33,192
at Irell & Manella LLP where his

181
00:11:33,192 --> 00:11:37,096
practice focused on
intellectual property litigation.

182
00:11:37,096 --> 00:11:40,433
He holds a juris doctorate
from the UCLA school of law.

183
00:11:40,433 --> 00:11:41,100
Mr. Iancu holds a Juris Doctor
from the UCLA School of Law.

184
00:11:41,100 --> 00:11:44,137
He also has a Master of Science
in mechanical engineering and

185
00:11:44,137 --> 00:11:48,441
a Bachelor of Science in aerospace
engineering also from UCLA.

186
00:11:48,441 --> 00:11:52,378
He's a huge fan of Kareem.

187
00:11:52,378 --> 00:11:55,949
He even has a
bobble head on his desk.

188
00:11:55,949 --> 00:12:06,025
So please join me in welcoming USPTO
director Andrei Iancu. (Applause)

189
00:12:06,025 --> 00:12:10,863
>> ANDREI IANCU: Thank you, Mary,
and so good to see all of you here.

190
00:12:10,863 --> 00:12:13,533
Intellectual property
really is exciting.

191
00:12:13,533 --> 00:12:18,271
I can tell from all of you
being here that that is the case.

192
00:12:18,271 --> 00:12:21,474
The fact is that
intellectual property is our future.

193
00:12:21,474 --> 00:12:24,277
As I often say through
the doors of the U.S.

194
00:12:24,277 --> 00:12:29,315
Patent and Trademark
Office walks our future.

195
00:12:29,315 --> 00:12:31,484
And how true that is.

196
00:12:31,484 --> 00:12:35,021
It is especially wonderful to be
here with all of you, and I'd like

197
00:12:35,021 --> 00:12:39,626
to thank the entire staff at the
Smithsonian's National Museum of

198
00:12:39,626 --> 00:12:45,031
American History for hosting us
during this two‑day festival.

199
00:12:45,031 --> 00:12:48,534
We are so pleased to collaborate
with the Smithsonian on shining a

200
00:12:48,534 --> 00:12:52,505
spotlight on the importance
of trademarks in the

201
00:12:52,505 --> 00:12:53,873
global marketplace.

202
00:12:53,873 --> 00:12:57,944
I also want to thank the more
than 12,000 employees of the U.S.

203
00:12:57,944 --> 00:13:03,483
Patent and Trademark Office for
everything they do on a daily basis

204
00:13:03,483 --> 00:13:08,421
to advance intellectual property and
the effort they have put together

205
00:13:08,421 --> 00:13:10,089
for this event.

206
00:13:10,089 --> 00:13:15,561
I often consider the most
valuable asset of a company.

207
00:13:15,561 --> 00:13:20,667
Trademarks prevent confusion in
the marketplace by helping consumers

208
00:13:20,667 --> 00:13:27,407
identify their trusted or preferred
brands thereby engendering good will

209
00:13:27,407 --> 00:13:30,109
and customer loyalty.

210
00:13:30,109 --> 00:13:35,014
Some of the world's most famous
brands are valued at hundreds of

211
00:13:35,014 --> 00:13:39,218
millions of dollars
and sometimes more.

212
00:13:39,218 --> 00:13:41,387
The U.S. Patent and
Trademark Office

213
00:13:41,387 --> 00:13:45,325
creates and
maintains the federal register

214
00:13:45,325 --> 00:13:53,332
of trademarks that provides notice
of 2.3 million marks in use today.

215
00:13:53,332 --> 00:13:58,705
Needles to say and as Mary just
mentioned in her remarks, trademarks

216
00:13:58,705 --> 00:14:03,643
play a significant role in
the United States economy.

217
00:14:03,643 --> 00:14:08,648
The primary function of the
trademarks division at the
USPTO is

218
00:14:08,648 --> 00:14:14,620
to examine and register
trademarks, service marks,
certification marks,

219
00:14:14,620 --> 00:14:18,424
and collective membership marks
that meet the requirements of the

220
00:14:18,424 --> 00:14:20,560
Trademark Act.

221
00:14:20,560 --> 00:14:24,697
Critical to that mission is
educating the public about the

222
00:14:24,697 --> 00:14:27,333
importance and value of trademarks.

223
00:14:27,333 --> 00:14:31,838
And we work hard
every day to do this.

224
00:14:31,838 --> 00:14:35,608
Some of the ways we educate the
general public and business owners

225
00:14:35,608 --> 00:14:40,680
about trademarks is through the
creation of educational materials as

226
00:14:40,680 --> 00:14:46,352
well as videos posted on the
Internet as well as on our website.

227
00:14:46,352 --> 00:14:50,623
We also participate in community
events throughout the country and

228
00:14:50,623 --> 00:14:54,660
provide training and
instruction on trademark law.

229
00:14:54,660 --> 00:14:59,632
And of course, events like this
one are a big part of that effort

230
00:14:59,632 --> 00:15:04,237
because we can introduce thousands
of people like those of you here

231
00:15:04,237 --> 00:15:09,809
today on the importance of
trademarks and how to learn more

232
00:15:09,809 --> 00:15:15,681
about them today we're launching
another public education initiative.

233
00:15:15,681 --> 00:15:20,286
This time on the
subject of counterfeit goods.

234
00:15:20,286 --> 00:15:26,492
Counterfeits are goods that
appear to be safe and legitimate but

235
00:15:26,492 --> 00:15:32,865
unlawfully copy familiar brand
names and are sold illegally.

236
00:15:32,865 --> 00:15:35,935
According to the Organization
for Economic Cooperation and
Development,

237
00:15:35,935 --> 00:15:42,441
trade in counterfeit goods
has increased more than 80%

238
00:15:42,441 --> 00:15:51,117
in the last five years, increasing
to $250 billion annually in 2008 to

239
00:15:51,117 --> 00:15:56,322
more than $461 billion in 2013.

240
00:15:56,322 --> 00:16:00,226
Additionally, the report determined
that counterfeit products now

241
00:16:00,226 --> 00:16:07,166
represent more than
2.5% of all world trade.

242
00:16:07,166 --> 00:16:11,804
And while some people believe
that counterfeiting is a, quote,

243
00:16:11,804 --> 00:16:17,910
victimless crime, it is important
to note that every day consumers are

244
00:16:17,910 --> 00:16:23,282
exposed to ineffective and
sometimes life‑threatening

245
00:16:23,282 --> 00:16:25,885
counterfeit products.

246
00:16:25,885 --> 00:16:31,057
Recognizing how vitally important it
is to educate the public about the

247
00:16:31,057 --> 00:16:37,396
harms of counterfeit goods, the
USPTO is today launching a video

248
00:16:37,396 --> 00:16:44,604
contest to collect 30 to 60
second videos about counterfeits.

249
00:16:44,604 --> 00:16:50,243
The video contest is entitled
consumers combat counterfeits.

250
00:16:50,243 --> 00:16:54,847
The winning videos will appear on
the USPTO website and be considered

251
00:16:54,847 --> 00:16:58,484
for use as public
service announcements.

252
00:16:58,484 --> 00:17:02,555
In each of your tote bags you
will find the flier with additional

253
00:17:02,555 --> 00:17:15,768
information, and you can learn
more at
www.USPTO.gov/tmvideocontest,

254
00:17:15,768 --> 00:17:18,304
one word.

255
00:17:18,304 --> 00:17:21,073
So thank you all
again for being here.

256
00:17:21,073 --> 00:17:24,844
I encourage you to stay and
enjoy the other activities and

257
00:17:24,844 --> 00:17:27,113
presentations throughout the day.

258
00:17:27,113 --> 00:17:32,118
And with that, let me turn it
over to our Commissioner of
Trademarks,

259
00:17:32,118 --> 00:17:35,254
Mary Denison who will
introduce our key note speaker.

260
00:17:35,254 --> 00:17:35,922
Thank you.

261
00:17:35,922 --> 00:17:42,194
(Applause) >> MARY
BONEY DENISON: Thank you.

262
00:17:42,194 --> 00:17:45,665
Let me take a moment
to correct an error.

263
00:17:45,665 --> 00:17:50,236
I forgot to credit the owner of
the copyrighted video we used

264
00:17:50,236 --> 00:17:54,206
Daniel T Allan from Sovev
Media thank you very much.

265
00:17:54,206 --> 00:17:59,111
Now it is my honor to introduce
Kareem Abdul‑Jabbar, the greatest

266
00:17:59,111 --> 00:18:01,814
basketball player in history.

267
00:18:01,814 --> 00:18:04,650
We are so honored to
have him here today.

268
00:18:04,650 --> 00:18:09,388
He retired from the NBA after
playing a record 20 seasons as well

269
00:18:09,388 --> 00:18:13,392
as setting records for points
scored, games played, minutes

270
00:18:13,392 --> 00:18:17,396
played, blocked shots
and defensive rebounds.

271
00:18:17,396 --> 00:18:26,973
He was also a record six time NBA
MVP and 19 time NBA all star, a 15

272
00:18:26,973 --> 00:18:34,447
time all-NBA selection and an 11
time all defensive team member.

273
00:18:34,447 --> 00:18:39,685
Since retiring from the NBA he
has been active as an
education advocate,

274
00:18:39,685 --> 00:18:42,888
writer of social commentary,
novels, history books.

275
00:18:42,888 --> 00:18:48,227
He's written 15 books including
his most recent New York Times best

276
00:18:48,227 --> 00:18:53,733
sellers Coach Wooden and Me,
our 50‑year Friendship On and
Off the Court

277
00:18:53,733 --> 00:18:58,104
and Becoming Kareem,
Growing Up On and Off the Court.

278
00:18:58,104 --> 00:19:03,275
Mr. Abdul‑Jabbar also produced a
documentary adaptation of

279
00:19:03,275 --> 00:19:04,610
On the Shoulders of Giants

280
00:19:04,610 --> 00:19:08,214
which won a NAACP image award.

281
00:19:08,214 --> 00:19:12,418
Of particular interest on this
day ‑‑ excuse me ‑‑ championing

282
00:19:12,418 --> 00:19:15,721
intellectual property rights, it's
important to note that he's written

283
00:19:15,721 --> 00:19:18,891
a book called What
Color is My World?

284
00:19:18,891 --> 00:19:23,663
The Lost History of African
American inventors.

285
00:19:23,663 --> 00:19:27,233
In October he'll have
another novel coming out.

286
00:19:27,233 --> 00:19:32,304
In 2016 President Obama awarded
him The Presidential Medal of
Freedom,

287
00:19:32,304 --> 00:19:36,909
the highest honor for civilians.

288
00:19:36,909 --> 00:19:41,247
He's here to talk about the
importance and fun of trademarks

289
00:19:41,247 --> 00:19:44,116
and intellectual property.
Without further ado,

290
00:19:44,116 --> 00:19:48,120
please join me in welcoming the
legendary Kareem Abdul‑Jabbar.

291
00:19:48,120 --> 00:19:58,431
(Applause)

292
00:19:58,431 --> 00:19:59,932
>> KAREEM ABDUL‑JABBAR: Thank
you, Commissioner Denison and

293
00:19:59,932 --> 00:20:03,502
good afternoon, everyone.
It's really great to be back

294
00:20:03,502 --> 00:20:06,739
here at the Smithsonian National
Museum of American History

295
00:20:06,739 --> 00:20:09,809
to talk about the importance of
intellectual property

296
00:20:09,809 --> 00:20:13,379
and trademarks in particular.

297
00:20:13,379 --> 00:20:16,882
I was really pleased to be asked to
participate in a National Trademark

298
00:20:16,882 --> 00:20:23,222
Exposition so I could talk to
you about why trademarks matter.

299
00:20:23,222 --> 00:20:25,558
Let's start at the beginning.

300
00:20:25,558 --> 00:20:30,096
Trademarks are product
names or names of services.

301
00:20:30,096 --> 00:20:30,763
Look around you.

302
00:20:30,763 --> 00:20:35,101
We have a bunch of exhibiters
here today who all own

303
00:20:35,101 --> 00:20:37,103
trademark registrations.

304
00:20:37,103 --> 00:20:41,073
I even own a trademark
registration for my name.

305
00:20:41,073 --> 00:20:44,410
I'll talk more
about that in a minute.

306
00:20:44,410 --> 00:20:47,113
I'd like to take a moment to give
you a few reasons why you should

307
00:20:47,113 --> 00:20:53,919
take ‑‑ why you should pay attention
to the issue of trademarks.

308
00:20:53,919 --> 00:20:59,458
First, trademarks are a
form of consumer protection.

309
00:20:59,458 --> 00:21:03,229
Trademarks let customers
know the source of products and

310
00:21:03,229 --> 00:21:05,965
the services in the marketplace.

311
00:21:05,965 --> 00:21:08,968
Potential customers want to
know that the T‑shirt or computer

312
00:21:08,968 --> 00:21:14,173
software that they are considering
buying is the specific product that

313
00:21:14,173 --> 00:21:16,308
they want.

314
00:21:16,308 --> 00:21:20,079
Customers want to know the product
they seek is real and the quality

315
00:21:20,079 --> 00:21:24,116
that they have come to associate
with that trademark, not a knockoff

316
00:21:24,116 --> 00:21:26,819
from someone else.

317
00:21:26,819 --> 00:21:29,789
So one critical thing that a
trademark offers is

318
00:21:29,789 --> 00:21:31,524
consumer protection.

319
00:21:31,524 --> 00:21:35,895
Second, trademarks enable you to
build a brand for your product,

320
00:21:35,895 --> 00:21:39,532
especially today via social media.

321
00:21:39,532 --> 00:21:41,400
And trademarks add value.

322
00:21:41,400 --> 00:21:47,439
In some cases your trademark might
be just ‑‑ might just be the most

323
00:21:47,439 --> 00:21:50,543
valuable piece of
property that you own.

324
00:21:50,543 --> 00:21:54,547
The most valuable trademark in the
world is Apple trademark which was

325
00:21:54,547 --> 00:22:00,085
valued in the 2017 Interbrand
survey at over $180 billion.

326
00:22:00,085 --> 00:22:04,557
I know that my trademark
is not worth that much.

327
00:22:04,557 --> 00:22:09,128
(Laughter)
 >> KAREEM ABDUL‑JABBAR:
But it's still very valuable and can

328
00:22:09,128 --> 00:22:12,031
keep consumers buying my product.

329
00:22:12,031 --> 00:22:15,367
Trademarks can add a lot
of value to your business.

330
00:22:15,367 --> 00:22:19,572
Third, trademarks can be recognized
around the globe and therefore they

331
00:22:19,572 --> 00:22:23,475
transcend language,
culture, and borders.

332
00:22:23,475 --> 00:22:26,612
Whenever I travel overseas, I'm
always interested in seeing what

333
00:22:26,612 --> 00:22:30,916
American brands I can spot even
when I can't read the language.

334
00:22:30,916 --> 00:22:36,155
I can always spot
McDonald's golden arches or the
Starbucks mermaid.

335
00:22:36,155 --> 00:22:40,426
Finally I know firsthand the
importance and value of a
trademark.

336
00:22:40,426 --> 00:22:43,829
As I mentioned a moment ago I
have a registration for my
name,

337
00:22:43,829 --> 00:22:45,731
Kareem Abdul‑Jabbar.

338
00:22:45,731 --> 00:22:50,536
I use it to sell T‑shirts,
jerseys, socks, shoes, et cetera.

339
00:22:50,536 --> 00:22:55,541
More importantly I use my
brand to promote good works.

340
00:22:55,541 --> 00:23:00,479
One of my favorite causes is my
nonprofit The Skyhook
Foundation.

341
00:23:00,479 --> 00:23:04,950
When many of you hear the term
skyhook associated with my name,

342
00:23:04,950 --> 00:23:08,020
you likely think of the
basketball shot I became

343
00:23:08,020 --> 00:23:09,788
known for perfecting when I
played in the NBA.

344
00:23:09,788 --> 00:23:12,992
The shot that couldn't be blocked.

345
00:23:12,992 --> 00:23:16,428
It's how have some
come to describe it.

346
00:23:16,428 --> 00:23:19,898
From that shot my foundation's
mission was created to give kids a

347
00:23:19,898 --> 00:23:22,768
shot that could not be blocked.

348
00:23:22,768 --> 00:23:25,571
I try to do this by bringing
educational opportunities to

349
00:23:25,571 --> 00:23:27,706
underserved communities.

350
00:23:27,706 --> 00:23:31,710
One of the ways we accomplish
this is through Camp Skyhook
where we

351
00:23:31,710 --> 00:23:33,612
bring 4th and 5th graders to a
camp in the

352
00:23:33,612 --> 00:23:36,715
Angeles National Forest for five
days during the school week and

353
00:23:36,715 --> 00:23:41,720
let them learn about nature and
give them hands-on experience

354
00:23:41,720 --> 00:23:45,958
with science, technology,
engineering, and math, known as

355
00:23:45,958 --> 00:23:47,693
STEM.

356
00:23:47,693 --> 00:23:51,597
The STEM field contributes so much
to the world and those who work in

357
00:23:51,597 --> 00:23:56,001
these areas should be
revered as heroes in our society.

358
00:23:56,001 --> 00:23:59,872
As we all know, there can only
be a few superstars in sports or

359
00:23:59,872 --> 00:24:01,073
entertainment.

360
00:24:01,073 --> 00:24:06,178
But the opportunities for those
in STEM fields is truly limitless.

361
00:24:06,178 --> 00:24:09,848
To generate interest, excitement,
and enthusiasm among our kids for

362
00:24:09,848 --> 00:24:15,354
science, technology, engineering,
and math, we have to enable them to

363
00:24:15,354 --> 00:24:18,057
see themselves in a STEM role.

364
00:24:18,057 --> 00:24:22,494
We try to encourage them and
provide opportunities to learn more.

365
00:24:22,494 --> 00:24:27,333
We need our kids to have role models
other than rap stars, reality stars

366
00:24:27,333 --> 00:24:29,735
or basketball stars.

367
00:24:29,735 --> 00:24:33,605
I've never considered myself ‑‑
I've never considered my basketball

368
00:24:33,605 --> 00:24:36,208
skills to be my greatest asset.

369
00:24:36,208 --> 00:24:39,778
I've always considered my
greatest asset to be my mind.

370
00:24:39,778 --> 00:24:42,581
We need to get kids
thinking that way.

371
00:24:42,581 --> 00:24:46,051
It is great for kids to have
athletic aspirations but not at the

372
00:24:46,051 --> 00:24:49,088
expense of their education.

373
00:24:49,088 --> 00:24:52,658
Too often in our culture we treat
entertainers, musicians and athletes

374
00:24:52,658 --> 00:24:57,229
as heroes and forget to highlight
the real heroes our countries

375
00:24:57,229 --> 00:25:00,265
inventors and innovators who
make a difference in the

376
00:25:00,265 --> 00:25:03,535
world today and in the
future through their curiosity,

377
00:25:03,535 --> 00:25:07,906
resourcefulness, perseverance
and innovation.

378
00:25:07,906 --> 00:25:11,343
Although innovation affects every
aspect of our daily lives, we never

379
00:25:11,343 --> 00:25:16,115
seem to stop and appreciate the
contributions of our
nation's inventors

380
00:25:16,115 --> 00:25:20,619
we also don't take time to
highlight the diversity of
inventors.

381
00:25:20,619 --> 00:25:24,022
Children need to see that people
who look like them have been able to

382
00:25:24,022 --> 00:25:29,028
achieve success by celebrating the
contributions of inventors we help

383
00:25:29,028 --> 00:25:33,298
children see the value in invention
and hopefully aspire to become

384
00:25:33,298 --> 00:25:35,634
inventors themselves.

385
00:25:35,634 --> 00:25:39,438
I consider it my responsibility
to use my trademark, Kareem

386
00:25:39,438 --> 00:25:43,375
Abdul‑Jabbar, to make
this world a better place.

387
00:25:43,375 --> 00:25:46,712
But it is the responsibility of
all of us to inspire future
generations

388
00:25:46,712 --> 00:25:51,383
to pursue careers in STEM and to
find ways to give them access to

389
00:25:51,383 --> 00:25:56,388
information and opportunities to
experiences in that ‑‑ to experience

390
00:25:56,388 --> 00:25:58,690
jobs in that field.

391
00:25:58,690 --> 00:26:03,529
By encouraging interests in STEM
careers we improve the future and we

392
00:26:03,529 --> 00:26:07,633
give our children an opportunity at
changing the world by giving them a

393
00:26:07,633 --> 00:26:10,202
shot that can't be blocked.

394
00:26:10,202 --> 00:26:14,273
Thank you so much and
now, let's cut that ribbon.

395
00:26:14,273 --> 00:00:00,000
(Applause)