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 [Search a list of Patent Appplications for class PLT]   CLASS PLT,PLANTS
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SECTION I - CLASS DEFINITION

This is the class for plants which are patentable under Title 35 U.S. Code, Section 161, which provides for the granting of a patent to whoever invents or discovers and asexually reproduces any distinct and new variety of plant, including cultivated sports, mutants, hybrids, and newly found seedlings other than a tuber propagated plant or a plant found in an uncultivated state.

SECTION II - LINES WITH OTHER CLASSES AND WITHIN THIS CLASS

II. LINES WITH OTHER CLASSES AND WITHIN THIS CLASS

In order to be properly classified, a patent or publication is placed in the first appearing of a series of coordinate subclasses which includes the subject matter of the patent or publication. Thus, a patent describing a plant which is both a conifer and a shrub is classified as a conifer rather than a shrub. A patent not fitting the description of any of the first line subclasses is classified in miscellaneous subclasses elsewhere. (See Subclass References to the Current Class, below.)

A subclass which is positioned one indent to the left of one or more following subclasses is considered to be the residual (miscellaneous) subclass for that group of subclasses. Thus, the subclass titled Shrubs or vines, includes those shrubs or vines which are not azaleas or rhododendrons, barberries, buddleias, etc., while the subclass titled Camellia, includes those camellias which are neither pink nor red. (See Subclass References to the Current Class, below.)

Subclasses in this class have been created based on the commercial or market class in which the plants are normally found. For example, though a tomato is botanically a fruit, it is sold as a vegetable, therefore making classification proper for the vegetable area rather than the fruit area. Though some varieties of philodendron may grow as a vine, it is normally sold with the ornamental foliage plants and therefore is classified in that area rather than with the vines and shrubs. (See Subclass References to the Current Class, below.)

If a plant is noted for its flowers and its foliage, it will normally be classified with the ornamental flowering plants since those subclasses appear in the schedule prior to the ornamental foliage subclasses. Whether a plant is noted for its foliage or its flowers may sometimes be a subjective decision. When in doubt, look at the subclass definitions for guidance.

The color definitions given herein are substantially those found in Webster"s New International Dictionary, Second Edition, Unabridged, published by G.C. Merriam Co., Springfield, MA. Each color definition refers to one or more plant patents so that the blossoms of the plant patents themselves comprise a kind of color chart to illustrate the words of the definitions. The color designations apply to the color of the blossom when it is newly open and in an unfaded condition, i.e., not in bud or in full bloom. The color designation in the patent specification is the color used to determine placement of patents.

The effects of light and shadow should be discounted when determining the true color of a blossom for purposes of classification. Also, the color at the base of the petal should be disregarded except where a two-tone or bicolor effect is quite obvious.

All the color designations refer to solid colors unless clearly indicated otherwise. Thus, considering the group of climbing roses, a striped or bicolor rose would not be proper for any of the indented subclasses but would be placed in the miscellaneous subclass for climbing roses. In determining whether or not a blossom has a solid color, the appearance of the flower as a whole is the proper criterion. Minor flecks and gradations of color should be disregarded. However, both faces of all petals must be substantially the same color. (See References to the Current Class, below.)

SECTION III - SUBCLASS REFERENCES TO THE CURRENT CLASS

SEE OR SEARCH THIS CLASS, SUBCLASS:

109,for climbing roses.
156+,for fruit.
213,for a plant classified as a conifer.
226,for a plant classified as a shrub.
226,for shrubs or vines which are not azaleas or rhodendrons, barberries, buddleias, etc.
243,for camellias which are neither pink nor red.
258,for vegetable.
373+,for ornamental foliage plants.
395,for miscellaneous.

SECTION IV - REFERENCES TO OTHER CLASSES

SEE OR SEARCH CLASS:

800Multicellular Living Organisms and Unmodified Parts Thereof and Related Processes,   subclasses 295+ for living multicellular plants and separated or severed parts thereof that have not undergone any modification or treatment subsequent to their separation (e.g., untreated seeds, etc.).

SUBCLASSES

[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 101]    101ROSE:
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which is a member of the genus Rosa and not otherwise provided for.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 102]    102Shrub:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 101.  Rose plant which is characterized as highly basally dominant, forming a profusion of upwardly extending canes, resulting in a dense, mounded, shrub-like specimen plant as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9715, 9191, and 8680.
(1) Note. This plant may also be characterized by short to medium length flowering stems, superior cold hardiness and disease resistance, coarseness of the blooms and/or plant, and abundant foliage. Shrub-like plants with highly quartered blooms are also included in this subclass.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 103]    103White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 102.  Shrub rose characterized by blossoms which are white (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray) as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9650, 9374, and 8871.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 104]    104Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 102.  Shrub rose characterized by blossoms which are yellow (a color which resembles the hue of ripe lemons or the color of sulfur) as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9007, 8668, and 8682.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 105]    105Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 102.  Shrub rose characterized by blossoms which are orange (a color varying from reddish red-yellow to red-yellow, in saturation from high to very high, and in brilliance from medium to high), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9705, 9527, and 9524.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 106]    106Salmon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 102.  Shrub rose characterized by blossoms which are salmon (a color which is reddish red-yellow, of medium saturation and high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent No. 7312.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 107]    107Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 102.  Shrub rose characterized by blossoms which are pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9680, 9641, and 9526.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 108]    108Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 102.  Shrub rose characterized by blossoms which are red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9649, 9537, and 9554.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 109]    109Climber:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 101.  Rose plant characterized by vigorous, long, erect or lax canes suitable for training on trellises or fences, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8019, 6892, and 5049.
(1) Note. "Pillar" and "Rambler" roses are proper for this and indented subclasses.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 110]    110White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 109.  Climbing rose characterized by blossoms which are white (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8689, 6706, and 2284.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 111]    111Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 109.  Climbing rose characterized by blossoms which are yellow (a color which resembles the hue of ripe lemons or the color of sulphur), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9012, 8411, and 6509.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 112]    112Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 109.  Climbing rose characterized by blossoms which are orange (a color varying from reddish red-yellow to red-yellow, in saturation from high to very high, and in brilliance from medium to high), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9356, 9233, and 9013.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 113]    113Salmon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 109.  Climbing rose characterized by blossoms which are salmon (a color which is reddish red-yellow, of medium saturation and high brilliance) as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 7617, 6596, and 1606.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 114]    114Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 109.  Climbing rose characterized by blossoms which are pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9612, 9492, and 7196.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 115]    115Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 109.  Climbing rose characterized by blossoms which are red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8741, 6817, and 4910.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 116]    116Miniature:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 101.  Rose plant which is characterized primarily by short stature (ranging in height from a few inches to approximately 20 inches), petite foliage, and blossoms of a diameter which is generally 1.5 inches or less, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9749, 9734, and 9033.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 117]    117White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 116.  Miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are white (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9280, 9279, and 9016.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 118]    118Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 116.  Miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are yellow (a color which resembles the hue of ripe lemons or the color of sulphur), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9414, 9401, and 9159.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 119]    119Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 116.  Miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are orange (a color varying from reddish red-yellow to red-yellow, in saturation from high to very high, and in brilliance from medium to high), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9656, 7606, and 7558.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 120]    120Salmon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 116.  Miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are salmon (a color which is reddish red-yellow, of medium saturation and high brilliance) as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9018, 8515, and 7032.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 121]    121Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 116.  Miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9735, 9717, and 9651.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 122]    122Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 116.  Miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9528, 9483, and 9090.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 123]    123Super-miniature:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 101.  Rose plant which is primarily characterized as being greater in height, stature, foliage size, and bloom size than miniatures, but still lesser than floribundas, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9821, 9798, and 9786.
(1) Note. Typical height ranges would be from greater than 18 inches to 30 inches plus, with bloom diameters characterized as greater than 1.5 inches, usually in the range of 2 to 2.5 inches.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 124]    124White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 123.  Super-miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are white (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8899, 8850, and 5557.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 125]    125Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 123.  Super-miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are yellow (a color which resembles the hue of ripe lemons or the color of sulfur), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 6560, 5690, and 5427.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 126]    126Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 123.  Super-miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are orange (a color varying from reddish red-yellow to red-yellow, in saturation from high to very high, and in brilliance from medium to high), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9420, 8578, and 5246.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 127]    127Salmon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 123.  Super-miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are salmon (a color which is reddish red-yellow, of medium saturation and high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8554, 7188, and 5118.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 128]    128Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 123.  Super-miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9790, 6139, and 6132.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 129]    129Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 123.  Super-miniature rose characterized by blossoms which are red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9160, 9063, and 8555.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 130]    130Grandiflora or hybrid tea:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 101.  Rose plant characterized as free flowering with large, well-shaped blooms borne singly or in small clusters on long stems, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9806, 9805, and 9706.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 131]    131Red bicolor:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms in which either the reverse or face side of the petal is red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby) and the other side of the petal is a different color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9376, 9064, and 9052.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 132]    132Mottled, multiple, or striped colors:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms exhibiting a splashing, striping, speckling, or dotting of two or more distinct colors, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9574, 9037, 8590, and 3623.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 133]    133White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms which are white (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9833, 9402, and 9328.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 134]    134Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms which are yellow (a color which resembles the hue of ripe lemons or the color of sulphur), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9719, 9608, and 9591.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 135]    135Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms which are orange (a color varying from reddish red-yellow to red-yellow, in saturation from high to very high, and in brilliance from medium to high), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9609, 9170, and 9116.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 136]    136Salmon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms which are salmon (a color which is reddish red-yellow, of medium saturation and high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9330, 9043, 8629.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 137]    137Light to medium pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9808, 9807, and 9289.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 138]    138Dark pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms which are a dark shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9564, 9403, and 8632.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 139]    139Light to medium red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms which range from a light to medium shade of red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9862, 9736, and 9636.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 140]    140`Dark red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 130.  Grandiflora or hybrid tea rose characterized by blooms which are a dark shade of red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9974, 9915, and 8754.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 141]    141Floribunda or polyantha:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 101.  Rose plant characterized as very free flowering with blooms borne in clusters as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9600, 9171, and 9161.
(1) Note. Floribundas are generally of lesser stature than hybrid teas or grandifloras, and polyanthas are generally smaller than floribundas, in bloom size as well as stature.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 142]    142Red bicolor:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms in which either the reverse or face side of the petal is red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby) and the other side of the petal is a different color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9405, 8579, and 7139.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 143]    143Mottled, multiple, or striped colors:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms exhibiting a splashing, striping, speckling or dotting of two or more distinct colors, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9592, 6255, and 5399.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 144]    144White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms which are white (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9720, 9629, 8580.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 145]    145Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms which are yellow (a color which resembles the hue of ripe lemons or the color of sulphur), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9657, 9512, and 8946.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 146]    146Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms which are orange (a color varying from reddish red-yellow to red-yellow, in saturation from high to very high, and in brilliance from medium to high), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9711, 8900, and 5428.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 147]    147Salmon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms which are salmon (a color which is reddish red-yellow, of medium saturation and high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9721, 6165, and 5764.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 148]    148Light to medium pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9722, 9613, and 9101.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 149]    149Dark pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms which are a dark shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9689, 9567, and 8183.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 150]    150Light to medium red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9032, 8743, and 8634.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 151]    151Dark red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 141.  Floribunda or polyantha rose characterized by blooms which are a dark shade of red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8025, 7996, and 7157.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 152]    152NUT (INCLUDING ORNAMENTAL VARIETY):
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which (a) bears edible hard-shelled dry fruit having a more or less distinct hull or (b) is an "ornamental" variety which may bear no fruit at all and is characterized by attractive foliage or blossoms.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 153]    153Pecan:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 152.  Nut plant which belongs to the genus Carya and species illinoinensis.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 154]    154Walnut:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 152.  Nut plant which belongs to the genus Juglans.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 155]    155Almond:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 152.  Nut plant which belongs to the genus Prunus and species amygdalus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 156]    156FRUIT (INCLUDING ORNAMENTAL VARIETY):
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which (a) bears edible and fleshy fruit or (b) is an "ornamental" variety of fruiting species which may bear no fruit at all and is characterized by attractive foliage or blossoms.
(1) Note. Interspecific hybrids are classified in the subclass which includes both or all plants involved in the interspecific cross. For example, a lemon X lime hybrid would be placed in the citrus subclass and a plum X apricot hybrid would be placed in the stone fruit subclass.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 157]    157Blueberry:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Vaccinium.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 158]    158Olive:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Olea.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 159]    159Mango:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Mangifera.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 160]    160Plantain or banana:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Musa.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 161]    161Apple:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Malus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 162]    162Sport of "Gala":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Gala.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 163]    163Sport of "Jonagold":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Jonagold.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 164]    164Sport of "Rome":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Rome.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 165]    165Sport of "MacIntosh":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree MacIntosh.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 166]    166Sport of "Jonathan":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Jonathan.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 167]    167Sport of "Winesap":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Winesap.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 168]    168Sport of "Fuji":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Fuji.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 169]    169Sport of "Cortland":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Cortland.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 170]    170Sport of "Empire":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Empire.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 171]    171Sport of "Red Delicious":
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is a sport derived from the tree Red Delicious.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 172]    172Green or yellow fruited variety:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which bears fruit of yellow or green predominant coloration.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 173]    173Crabapple:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is particularly noted for its ornamental shape, ultimate size, ornamental flowering habit, or any combination of such characteristics, and which would be marketed as or labelled, in the market place, with the generic identifier "crabapple".
(1) Note. Fruit of the crabapple is of reduced size, has mealy flesh, and is not normally marketable.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 174]    174Rootstock:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which is derived from breeding programs or discoveries and has primary utility for use as a rootstock.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 175]    175Columnar habit:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 161.  Apple plant which essentially bears fruit on or on short spurs off an essentially nonbranching main vertical stem.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 176]    176Pear:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Plant which belongs to the genus Pyrus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 177]    177Ornamental:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 176.  Pear plant which does not produce marketable fruit and which has attributes of desirable shape, canopy density, growth habit, fall coloration, etc., and is marketed as an ornamental tree.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 178]    178Asian:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 176.  Pear plant which produces fruit which is marketed within the market class Asian pear and which belongs to any of the species of Asian pears.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 179]    179Rootstock:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 176.  Pear plant which is derived from breeding programs or discoveries and has primary utility for use as a rootstock.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 180]    180Stone fruit tree:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Prunus and which may have within its genetic background more than one species within the genus.
(1) Note. Interspecific hybrids of stone fruits are proper for this subclass (e.g., plumcots, etc.).
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 181]    181Cherry:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 180.  Stone fruit plant which belongs to the genus Prunus and is marketed as a "cherry".
(1) Note. The cherries may be further characterized as "Bird", "Pin", "Wild", "Flowering", Duke, Mahaleb, Saint Luci, Manchu, Nanking , "Sour", "Pie", "Sweet’, Bing, Mazzard, Western Plum, etc.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 182]    182Ornamental:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 181.  Cherry plant which is used for ornamentation in landscape planting and which does not bear marketable fruit.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 183]    183Rootstock:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 181.  Cherry plant which is used as an understock for ornamental and fruit-bearing cherry trees.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 184]    184Plum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 180.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Prunus and is marketed as a "plum".
(1) Note. The plums are further characterized as Beach, Big tree, Bullace, Damson, Canada, Chicksaw, Mountain Cherry, Common, Hortulan, Hybrid, Japanese, Myrobalan or Cherry plum, Oklahoma, Pacific, Simon, Apricot, Wild Goose, etc.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 185]    185Prune:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 184.  Plum plant which belongs to the genus Prunus and is a member of a group which may be successfully sun dried without removal of pits and marketed as a "prune".
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 186]    186Apricot:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 180.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Prunus and is marketed as an "apricot".
(1) Note. Apricots found in this subclass include those of the species sibirica, armeniaca, mume, and dasycarpa, or hybrids having one of the subject species as the seed parent.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 187]    187Nectarine:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 180.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Prunus, and species persica which is characterized by having a smooth (absent fuzz or pubescence) skin covering the flesh of the fruit.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 188]    188White-fleshed clingstone, semi-clingstone, or semi-freestone:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 187.  Nectarine plant which bears fruit having flesh of predominantly white coloration and wherein the flesh once ripe is tenaciously adhered over substantially the entire surface of the stone.
(1) Note. Fruit which is described as "semi-clingstone" or "semi-freestone’ is classified as "clingstone".
(2) Note. Included in this subclass is fruit with predominantly white flesh but having flecks of another color or with red stone well color.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 189]    189White fleshed freestone:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 187.  Nectarine plant which bears fruit having flesh of predominantly white coloration and wherein the flesh once ripe readily separates from the stone leaving the stone substantially free of flesh.
(1) Note. Included in this subclass is fruit with predominantly white flesh but having flecks of another color or with red stone well color.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 190]    190Yellow-fleshed clingstone, semi-clingstone, or semi-freestone:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 187.  Nectarine plant which bears fruit having flesh of predominantly yellow coloration and wherein the flesh once ripe is tenaciously adhered over substantially the entire surface of the stone.
(1) Note. For examples, see U.S. plant patent Nos. 759, 1324, and 1545.
(2) Note. Included in this subclass is fruit with flesh which is predominantly yellow but may contain flecks of color other than yellow and red stone well color.
(3) Note. Fruit which is described as "semi-clingstone" or "semi-freestone" is classified as "clingstone".
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 191]    191Dwarf or semi-dwarf:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 190.  Yellow-fleshed clingstone nectarine plant wherein the tree is characterized as forming internodes of not more than one-quarter inch in length, and wherein the tree does not exceed a height of seven feet in its lifetime.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 192]    192Yellow-fleshed freestone:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 187.  Nectarine plant which bears fruit having flesh of predominantly yellow coloration and wherein the flesh once ripe readily separates from the stone leaving the stone substantially free of flesh.
(1) Note. Included in this subclass is fruit with yellow flesh having flecks other than yellow and red stone well color.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 193]    193Dwarf or semi-dwarf:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 192.  Yellow-fleshed freestone nectarine plant wherein the tree is characterized as forming internodes which do not exceed one-quarter inch in length, and wherein the height of the tree does not exceed seven feet in its lifetime.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 194]    194Peach:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 180.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Prunus and species persica, which is characterized by production of fruit which has skin covered by a layer of fuzz, hairs, pubescence, or tomentum.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 195]    195White-fleshed clingstone, semi-clingstone, or semi-freestone:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 194.  Peach plant which bears fruit having flesh of predominantly white coloration and wherein the flesh once ripe is tenaciously adhered over substantially the entire surface of the stone.
(1) Note. Fruit which is described as "semi-clingstone" or "semi-freestone" is classified as "clingstone".
(2) Note. Included in this subclass is fruit with predominantly white flesh but having flecks of another color or with red stone well color.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 196]    196White-fleshed freestone:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 194.  Peach plant which bears fruit having flesh of predominantly white coloration and wherein the flesh once ripe readily separates from the stone leaving the stone substantially free of flesh.
(1) Note. Included in this subclass is fruit with predominantly white flesh but having flecks of another color or with red stone well color.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 197]    197Yellow-fleshed clingstone, semi-clingstone, or semi-freestone:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 194.  Peach plant which bears fruit having flesh of predominantly yellow coloration wherein the flesh once ripe is tenaciously adhered to the stone.
(1) Note. Fruit which is described as "semi-clingstone" or "semi-freestone" is classified as "clingstone".
(2) Note. Included in this subclass is fruit with predominantly yellow flesh but having flecks other than yellow.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 198]    198Yellow-fleshed freestone:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 194.  Peach plant which bears fruit having flesh of predominantly yellow coloration wherein the flesh once ripe easily separates from the stone leaving the stone substantially free of flesh.
(1) Note. Included in this subclass is fruit having predominantly yellow flesh but with flecks other than yellow.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 199]    199Dwarf or semi-dwarf:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 198.  Yellow-fleshed freestone peach plant wherein the tree is characterized as forming internodes of not more than one-quarter inch in length, and wherein the height of the tree does not exceed seven feet in its lifetime.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 200]    200Avocado:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Persea and species americana.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 201]    201Citrus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Citrus having spritely tasting, segmented fruit covered by a rind of acidic, oily character.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 202]    202Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 201.  Citrus plant which belongs to the market class orange.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 203]    203Bramble:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Rubus normally characterized as "berry bushes" or "berry vines".
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 204]    204Raspberry:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 203.  Bramble plant known as a raspberry which bears fruit wherein the primary stem of the berry may be readily removed without disassociating the druplets as a bunch.
(1) Note. Members of this subclass may be commonly known as Black, Blackcap, European red, American, and Purple cane raspberries.
(2) Note. Members of this subclass may be hybrids of species including idaeus, strigosus, noglectus, and occidentalis.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 205]    205Grape:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Vitus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 206]    206New World:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 205.  Grape plant which belongs to the American species (e.g., lubruska, rotundifolia, etc.) and is characterized notably by longevity, disease resistance, high vigor, small bunches of berries, and berries having a strong, musky aroma, and large seeds.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 207]    207Green or yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 205.  Grape plant which bears fruit having green or yellow coloration of flesh, juice, and skin.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 208]    208Strawberry:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Fragaria.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 209]    209Everbearing:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 208.  Strawberry plant which has been developed to have an extended, lengthy harvest season; this plant is remontant in blooming and fruit setting habit and fails to ripen all fruit produced in one abbreviated season.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 210]    210Pomegranate:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which is a subtropical ornamental or a fruiting shrub which belongs to the genus Punica and species granatum L., and is characterized by fruit which are large, globose berries, filled with sections of angular, hard seeds which are covered by juicy, red, pink, or yellow astringent acid pulp.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 211]    211Ficus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Ficus which includes both fruit-bearing and ornamental members.
(1) Note. Included in this subclass are the commercial groups of edible and ornamental figs and rubber plants. These plants may take the form of trees, shrubs, or vines. They may or may not form edible fruit. They are generally characterized as enduring, abuse tolerant, attractive indoor plants with glabrous leaf top surfaces of bright green; silvery to grayed-green bottom leaf surfaces, commonly having smooth color contrasting bark.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 212]    212Flowering quince:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 156.  Fruit plant which belongs to the genus Cydoria.
(1) Note. Species may variously be presented as oblonga Mill and vulgaris Pers., or plants may alternatively be defined as members of Pyrus cydonia L.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 213]    213CONIFER:
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which is cone bearing, woody, with needlelike or scalelike leaves and aromatic resin ducts, and is usually evergreen and native to the temperate regions.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 214]    214Juniper:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 213.  Conifer which belongs to the genus Juniperus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 215]    215Yew:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 213.  Conifer which belongs to the genus Taxus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 216]    216BROADLEAF TREE:
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which is woody, broad leaved, generally unbranched near the base, having one distinct or rarely several distinct trunks which attain a height greater than about 10 feet.
(1) Note. Beech ( Fagus) trees are proper for this subclass.

SEE OR SEARCH THIS CLASS, SUBCLASS:

247,for holly plants ( Ilex).
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 217]    217Honey locust:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the genus Gleditsia L.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 218]    218Poplar:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the genus Populus L.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 219]    219Ash:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the genus Fraxinus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 220]    220Dogwood:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the family Cornaceae.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 221]    221Elm:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the family Ulmaceae.
(1) Note. Plants classified in this subclass are usually in the genus Ulmus L.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 222]    222Linden:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the family Tiliaceae.
(1) Note. Trees of this subclass are commonly called Basswood trees and are usually in the genus Tilia L.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 223]    223Magnolia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the family Magnoliaceae.
(1) Note. Plants classified in this subclass are usually in the genus Magnolia L.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 224]    224Maple:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the family Aceraceae.
(1) Note. Boxelder is proper for this subclass.
(2) Note. The genus for the maple is Acer.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 225]    225Oak:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 216.  Tree which belongs to the genus Quercus.
(1) Note. Genus Quercus is part of the Beech ( Fagaceae) family.

SEE OR SEARCH THIS CLASS, SUBCLASS:

216,for Beech ( Fagus L) trees.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 226]    226SHRUB OR VINE:
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which is woody, broad leaved, branched at or near the base, of shrubby or vining habit, and which may attain a height of about 15 feet.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 227]    227Lantana:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Lantana.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 228]    228Clematis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Clematis.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 229]    229Chamaelaucium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Chamaelaucium.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 230]    230Forsythia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Forsythia.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 231]    231Heather:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which is marketed as heath or heather .
(1) Note. Examples of plants which may be found in this subclass are those belonging to Chalone vulgaris, Erica persoluta, or any other species within Chalone and Erica.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 232]    232Mandevilla (Dipladenia):
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Mandevilla and may be marketed under the alternate name Dipladenia.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 233]    233Oleander:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Nerium.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 234]    234Pittosporum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Pittosporum.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 235]    235Nandina:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Nandina.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 236]    236Hop:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Humulus and the species lupulus.
(1) Note. The harvest cones of the hops vine are used in the flavoring of beers, stouts, and ales.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 237]    237Potentilla:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Potentilla.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 238]    238Azalea or rhododendron:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Rhododendron.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 239]    239Light to medium pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 238.  Plant characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 681, 1706, and 2122.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 240]    240Dark pink to red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 238.  Plant characterized by blooms which range in color from a dark shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1394, 1484, and 1983, to red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1283, 1717, and 2021.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 241]    241Barberry:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Berberis.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 242]    242Buddleia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Buddleia.
(1) Note. Plants of this subclass may also be identified by the common names Butterfly Bush and Summer Lilac.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 243]    243Camellia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Camellia.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 244]    244Light to medium pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 243.  Plant characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 907, 1800, and 1988.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 245]    245Dark pink to red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 243.  Plant characterized by blooms which range in color from a dark shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1074, 1107, and 1215, to red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 589, 927, and 1583.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 246]    246Euonymus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Euonymus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 247]    247Holly:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Ilex.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 248]    248Lilac:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Syringa.
(1) Note. Tree lilacs are properly classified in this subclass.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 249]    249English ivy (i.e., Hedera helix variety):
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Hedera and species helix.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 250]    250Hydrangea:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Hydrangea.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 251]    251Veronica:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Veronica.
(1) Note. Plants proper for this subclass are commercially recognized as Hebe or Hebe buxifolia.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 252]    252Crape myrtle:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Lagerstroemia.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 253]    253Pyracantha:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Pyracantha.
(1) Note. Plants of this subclass will commonly be referred to as Firethorn.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 254]    254Rhaphiolepis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Rhaphiolepis.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 255]    255Gardenia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Gardenia.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 256]    256Bougainvillea:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Bougainvillea.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 257]    257Hibiscus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 226.  Plant which belongs to the genus Hibiscus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 258]    258COMMERCIAL HERBACEOUS VEGETABLE OR HERB PLANT:
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which is in the market class of vegetable plant or herb plant.
(1) Note. These plants or their extracts may be used as food, medicines, for cosmetic purposes, etc.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 259]    259Mint:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 258.  Plant which belongs to the genus Mentha.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 260]    260Asparagus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 258.  Plant which belongs to the genus Asparagus.
(1) Note. The asparagus is dioecious, having an extensive system of storage and feeder roots, a spear producing crown, and spears maturing into brush, fern-like stalks generally resembling a tree in branching habit, ranging between 4 to 12 feet in height, having cladodes in lieu of true leaves.
(2) Note. Most activity in this subclass will be limited to commercial varieties of A. officinalis.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 261]    261Tomato:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 258.  Plant which belongs to the genus and species Lycopersicon esculentum.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 262]    262Rhubarb:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 258.  Plant which belongs to the genus Rheum ( R. x cultorum).
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 263.1]    263.1HERBACEOUS ORNAMENTAL FLOWERING PLANT (NICOTINIA, NASTURTIUM, ETC.):
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which is herbaceous and principally characterized by and grown for its attractive blossoms.
(1) Note. Annuals, biennials, perennials, and flowering house plants are proper for this subclass if not provided for specifically elsewhere (e.g., nicotinia, nasturtium, etc.).
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 264]    264African violet:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Saintpaulia.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 265]    265White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 264.  Violet which has white petal color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4777, 5190, and 7685.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 266]    266Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 264.  Violet which has pink petal color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 5016, 5494, and 7261.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 267]    267Red-purple:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 264.  Violet which has red-purple petal color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 7824, 7704, and 7028.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 268]    268Purple or blue with white edge:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 264.  Violet which is purple or blue but also has a petal edge band or margin colored white, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1077, 4972, and 5701.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 269]    269Single color with double or semi-double flower:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 264.  Violet which has a petal coloration which is essentially monochromatic and wherein the flowers have more than one single layer of petals, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4303, 5024, and 7331.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 270]    270Multicolor:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 264.  Violet which has petals which are bicolored or which have blushes, patches, spots, or other patterns of multiple colors, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3146, 5292, and 6525.
(1) Note. Purple or blue violets which also have a white marginal band are not included in this subclass.

SEE OR SEARCH THIS CLASS, SUBCLASS:

268,for purple or blue violets which also have a white marginal band.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 271]    271With double or semi-double flower:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 270.  Multicolor violet which has more than one single layer of petals, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4308, 7323, and 8136.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 272]    272Carnation or pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Dianthus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 273]    273Spray type:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 272.  Carnation or pink which by their genetic makeup express lateral flowerbuds with a terminal (primary) flower bud which render a spray of flowers on a single stem.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 274]    274White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 273.  Spray type carnation or pink characterized by blooms which are white, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4099, 6571, and 6600.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 275]    275Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 273.  Spray type carnation or pink characterized by blooms which are yellow, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3663, 5290, and 6273.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 276]    276Light to medium pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 273.  Spray type carnation or pink characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 747, 5511, and 6663.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 277]    277Dark pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 273.  Spray type carnation or pink characterized by blooms which are a dark shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3391, 5574, and 5793.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 278]    278Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 273.  Spray type carnation or pink characterized by blooms which are red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 5517, 6554, and 6626.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 279]    279White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 272.  Carnation or pink characterized by blooms which are white, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3437, 6417, and 6442.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 280]    280Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 272.  Carnation or pink characterized by blooms which are yellow, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3341, 5526, and 6447.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 281]    281Light to medium pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 272.  Carnation or pink characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 499, 750, and 767.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 282]    282Dark pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 272.  Carnation or pink characterized by blooms which are a dark shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 133, 319, and 2034.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 283]    283Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 272.  Carnation or pink characterized by blooms which are red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 148, 372, and 533.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 284]    284Chrysanthemum (e.g., Chrysanthemum indicum, etc.):
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Chrysanthemum or the genus Dendranthema (e.g., Chrysanthemum indicum, etc.).
(1) Note. Proper for this subclass are chrysanthemums, chrysanths, or mums which are other than Chrysanthemum morifolium, Dendranthema grandiflora, Chrysanthemum hortorum, or shasta daisy. The chrysanthemums proper for this subclass may be decorative, single (daisy), semi-double, anemone, etc. in type.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 285]    285Shasta daisy:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 284.  Plant which is a shasta daisy (i.e., C. maximum, Leucanthemum X superbum, C. leucanthemum X C. maximum).
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 286]    286Chrysanthemum morifolium or Dendranthema grandiflora (i.e., Chrysanthemum hortorum):
 This subclass is indented under subclass 284.  Chrysanthemum which belongs to Chrysanthemum morifolium, Dendranthema grandiflora, or Chrysanthemum hortorum.
(1) Note. This and indented subclasses include the genera and species C. morifolium, D. grandiflora, and C. hortorum which may or may not be decorative (e.g., single, daisy, anemone, etc.).
(2) Note. This subclass is proper for the nondecorative mums which are not specifically provided for below. This subclass includes chrysanthemums having five or fewer rows of ray florets such as the singles and anemones, and also the semi-doubles in which the ray florets are arranged in more than five rows but whose discs are clearly evident as daisy-like eyes.

SEE OR SEARCH THIS CLASS, SUBCLASS:

287+,for Chrysanthemum morifolium, Dendranthema grandiflora, or Chrysanthemum hortorum decorative chrysanthemums.
294+,for Chrysanthemum morifolium, Dendranthema grandiflora, or Chrysanthemum hortorum nondecorative (e.g., single, daisy, anemone, etc.) chrysanthemums of a color specified in the subclass titles.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 287]    287Decorative (i.e., double-flowered and indistinct eye of disc floret):
 This subclass is indented under subclass 286.  Chrysanthemum characterized as having more than five rows of ray florets and an indistinct eye of disc florets.
(1) Note. Decorative mums may be seen in various forms such as incurves, decoratives, pompoms, spiders, threads, and quills.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 288]    288White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 287.  Decorative chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are white (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1171, 2005, and 2025.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 289]    289Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 287.  Decorative chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are yellow (a color which resembles the hue of ripe lemons or the color of sulphur), as typified by U.S.plant patent Nos. 1348, 1547, and 1676.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 290]    290Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 287.  Decorative chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are orange (a color varying from reddish red-yellow to red-yellow, in saturation from high to very high, and in brilliance from medium to high), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1697, 1956, and 2029.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 291]    291Light to medium pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 287.  Decorative chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1020, 1168, and 1306.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 292]    292Dark pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 287.  Decorative chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are a dark shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1132, 1310, and 1824.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 293]    293Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 287.  Decorative chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1165, 1877, and 1889.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 294]    294White or cream:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 286.  Chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are white or cream as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 5475 and 3499.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 295]    295Yellow or gold:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 286.  Chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are yellow or gold as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4529 and 3189.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 296]    296Orange or bronze:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 286.  Chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are orange or bronze as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 2019 and 3445.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 297]    297Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 286.  Chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are pink as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 5815 and 1957.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 298]    298Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 286.  Chrysanthemum characterized by blooms which are red as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3446 and 5414.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 299]    299Freesia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Freesia.
(1) Note. Freesias are part of the Iris family. They are grown from corms and have fragrant, flaring, tubular flowers in a one-sided cluster at right angles to the stem and to the tall erect leaves.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 300]    300Fuchsia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant characterized as a chiefly tropical plant belonging to the genus Fuchsia and having drooping purplish, white, or reddish flowers.
(1) Note. Fuchsias are part of the Evening Primrose family. They have simple, usually opposite leaves and spectacular blossoms arising from the leaf axils on new growth.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 301]    301Gladiolus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Gladiolus and which have sword-shaped leaves of parallel venation, and a long showy flower spike which progressively opens flowers from the basal portion.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 302]    302Euphorbia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Euphorbia.
(1) Note. Euphorbia is also commonly known as a member of the Spurge family which includes Flowering Spurge, Snow-on-the-Mountain, Fire Glow, etc.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 303]    303Poinsettia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 302.  Euphorbia plant which belongs to the genus Euphorbia and species pulcherrima having large showy bracts under small flowers.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 304]    304White or cream:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 303.  Poinsettia plant characterized by blooms which are white as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 1802 and 2731.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 305]    305Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 303.  Poinsettia plant characterized by blooms which are substantially of a yellowish hue, as typified by U.S. plant patent No. 7229.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 306]    306Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 303.  Poinsettia plant characterized by blooms which are pink as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 2501 and 3735.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 307]    307Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 303.  Poinsettia plant characterized by blooms which are red as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4310 and 6104.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 308]    308Verbena:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Verbena and is characterized by their low habit, palmately divided or lobed, hairy leaves, delicate, colorful blossom clusters and drought tolerance.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 309]    309Alstroemeria:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Alstroemeria.
(1) Note. Genus Alstroemeria may include any of about 50 species of plants which are characterized as being forced from tuberous roots, forming a conspicuous tender crown, with flowering stems to 2 feet tall and more, and producing 9 to 12 flowers of funnel shape which are composed of 6 segments formed in 2 circles with the inner circle being distinct. Flowers may be spotted and multicolored.
(2) Note. The plants within this subclass are part of the Amaryllis family and may also be identified as "Inca lily" or "Peruvian lily".
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 310]    310Iris:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Iris.
(1) Note. These plants which are part of the family Iridaceae are characterized as being rhizomatous or bulbous, having sword-like, stiff, blue-green to green leaves of parallel venation; colorful, multiflowered spikes, with flowers emerging from sheathing scales on the scape. The flowers have three outer (fall) reflexed petals which may be bearded basally and three inner (erect) standard segments.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 311]    311Orchid:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the family Orchidaceae.
(1) Note. These plants are characterized as having sympodial or monopodial growth, pseudobulbs, leaves of parallel venation, and flowers which are terminal, and which are normally composed of three sepals, two upper and one lower bearded petal centering a column.
(2) Note. While this family contains over 50,000 members of a myriad of descriptions, predominant commercial species will be limited to Cattleya, Vanda, and Cymbidium. This subclass is intended to comprehend all plants which are to be commercially marketed as "Orchid" plants by art recognition.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 312]    312Daylily:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Hemerocallis.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 313]    313Lily:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Lilium.
(1) Note. These plants are characterized as emerging from scaled bulbs, lance-like leaves, and funnel to bell-shaped flowers with six spreading or recurving segments, with plural, long-lasting flowers opening progressively on individual stems spaced along or radiating from the top portion of the main stem.
(2) Note. More than 80 species and interspecific hybrids of lilies are included in this subclass.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 314]    314Asiatic:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 313.  Lily which belongs to the market class Asiatic hybrid lily.
(1) Note. Asiatic lilies are characterized by the presence of a nectary structure at the base of each of the tepals and the absence of pilose projections on the out-facing surfaces of the tepals.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 315]    315Oriental:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 313.  Lily which belongs to the market class Oriental hybrid lily.
(1) Note. Oriental lilies are characterized by the absence of a nectary structure at the base of each of the tepals and the presence of pilose projections on the out-facing surfaces of the tepals.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 316]    316Peony:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Paeonia, having flowers which are large, showy, usually solitary, and terminal of varied coloration (e.g., pink, white, cream, red, etc.).
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 317]    317Impatiens:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Impatiens.
(1) Note. Impatiens are tender, succulent, having foliage in colors from green to multi-color variations, and single or double spurred flowers of shades in white, pink, orange, and red, and which form seed pods which forcibly dehisce seeds on maturity.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 318.1]    318.1New Guinea (e.g., bicolor, multicolor, etc.):
 This subclass is indented under subclass 317.  Impatiens plants which belong to the species I. hawkeri.
(1) Note. New Guinea impatiens included in this subclass may have petals which are bicolored or characterized by blooms exhibiting a splashing, speckling, dotting, spotting, flecking, marbling color, or variegation of two or more distinct colors, or other patterns of multiple colors on the petals as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8937, 8904, 13699, 10255, 13009, and 13704.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 318.2]    318.2White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 318.1.  New Guinea impatiens which are characterized by blooms which are white (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 13001, 13373, 8422, 9138, 11581, and 14170.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 318.3]    318.3Orange, orange-red, or salmon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 318.1.  New Guinea impatiens which are characterized by blooms which are orange (a color varying from reddish red-yellow to red-yellow, in saturation from high to very high, and in brilliance from medium to high) or salmon (a color which is reddish red-yellow, of medium saturation and high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 13700, 13468, 9144, 12695, and 10870.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 318.4]    318.4Light to medium pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 318.1.  New Guinea impatiens which are characterized by blooms which range from a light to a medium shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 12095, 12091, 13043, 12567, 13812, 13579, 13697, and 9668.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 318.5]    318.5Dark pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 318.1.  New Guinea impatiens which are characterized by blooms which are a dark shade of pink (a color varying from reddish blue-red to yellowish red, from low to medium saturation, and from high to very high brilliance), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 13714, 12234, 8409, 13581, and 13711.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 318.6]    318.6Red-purple, purple, or lavender:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 318.1.  New Guinea impatiens which have a petal color which is essentially within the color ranges of purple, red-purple, or lavender, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 13224, 12561, 14023, 13713, 13840, 12545, 13096, 12093, 14203, 11370, 10860, 10432, 13839, and 13712.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 318.7]    318.7Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 318.1.  New Guinea impatiens which have a petal color which is red (a color ranging from that of blood to that of a ruby), as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 12096, 14000, 11427, 13926, 12096, 8111, 8397, and 10237.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 319]    319Double flowered:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 318.1.  New guinea impatiens which have more than one single row of petals.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 320]    320Phlox:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Phlox and which is characterized by having lance-shaped leaves and flower clusters which may be white, pink, purple, etc.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 321]    321Dahlia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Dahlia and which is a tender, foliaceous plant characterized by having tuberous roots and large, colorful flowers.
(1) Note. Flowers of plants of this subclass may be of a myriad of colors and shades, single, semi-double, or fully double. Plant height may range from several inches to several feet. Foliage may be green or purple.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 322]    322Snapdragon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Antirrhinum.
(1) Note. These plants are characterized by having a plurality of individual progressively opening flowers on a spike which bear an imagined resemblance to the mouth of a dragon; flowers are showy, two-lipped, variously colored, and bloom for long periods.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 323.]    323.Viola:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Viola.
(1) Note. These plants bear flowers which resemble those of violets, having five petals, the lower three normally or occasionally being distinctly rayed, and mature flowers normally flat when fully expanded; flowers are rich and wide in color variation, but flowers may be monochromatic.
(2) Note. The genus Viola includes both the pansy and the violet.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 324]    324Geranium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genera Pelargonium or Geranium.
(1) Note. The genus Pelargonium includes the common garden geranium while the members of the genus Geranium are commonly known as Cranesbills.
(2) Note. These plants have divided to rounded leaves which are frequently colorfully rayed, normally characteristically scented, and which bear large clusters of flowers on short flower stems carried by a primary stem to reside atop the foliage; numerous, showy flowers of normally the same color and shade are open at once to give the appearance of a ball; and flower colors are normally in shades of red, pink, white, etc.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 325]    325Zonal:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 324.  Geranium plant which belongs to Pelargonium zonale or Pelargonium X hortorum.
(1) Note. The Zonal geraniums are also known as Fish geraniums.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 326]    326White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 325.  Zonal geranium plant which has a petal color which is essentially white, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8894, 9796, and 10012.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 327]    327Peach, salmon, or orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 325.  Zonal geranium plant which has a petal color which is essentially within the color ranges of peach, salmon, and orange, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 7936, 8285, and 9773.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 328]    328Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 325.  Zonal geranium plant which has an essentially pink petal color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4215, 6708, and 9572.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 329]    329Purple, red-purple, or lavender:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 325.  Zonal geranium plant which has a petal color which is essentially within the color ranges of purple, red-purple, or lavender, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 2868, 7083, and 9307.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 330]    330Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 325.  Zonal geranium plant which has an essentially red petal color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9551, 9747, and 9774.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 331]    331Regal or Martha Washington:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 324.  Geranium plant which belongs to Pelargonium X domesticum.
(1) Note. Martha Washington geraniums are also known as Summer Azaleas.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 332]    332Ivy leaf:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 324.  Geranium plant which belongs to Pelargonium peltatum and which is commonly known as Ivy leaf geranium.
(1) Note. The Ivy leaf geranium is also called the Hanging geranium.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 333]    333Streptocarpus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Streptocarpus.
(1) Note. Streptocarpus is characterized by having low growing, deep green, generally flat but rugose leaves of normally accuminate shape, and colorful, deep throated, trumpet-formed normally clustered, five (fused) petals, on short pedicles carried by long, pubescent stems; and flower colors are in white, shades of blue, violet, purple, pink, and red.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 334]    334Gazania:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Gazania.
(1) Note. Gazanias are characterized by being semi-tender, low growing or spreading, flowering plants which tend to cover the soil when undisturbed; are sun loving and express colorful flowers which normally contain distinctive marks on basal portions of ray florets; flowers are normally single to semi-double, but may be fully double; and foliage is usually glabrous, but may be pubescent.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 335]    335Kalanchoe:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Kalanchoe.
(1) Note. Kalanchoes are characterized as being day-length responsive, having thick, usually rounded, succulent leaves and large clusters of showy, colorful florets which open nearly uniformly, giving the effect of tight masses of color held closely above foliage; and flower color is in shades of reds, yellows, golds, pinks, violets, etc.
(2) Note. Some long-stemmed varieties are used as cut flowers.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 336]    336White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 335.  Kalanchoe having a white flower color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8343 and 10238.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 337]    337Purple:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 335.  Kalanchoe having a purple flower color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4298, 4306, and 6878.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 338]    338Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 335.  Kalanchoe having a yellow flower color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3389, 3854, and 4744.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 339]    339Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 335.  Kalanchoe having a pink flower color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3290, 4343, and 5384.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 340]    340Orange:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 335.  Kalanchoe having an orange flower color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 5961, 7792, and 8998.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 341]    341Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 335.  Kalanchoe having a red flower color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 7524, 7794, and 9839.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 342]    342Aquatic plant:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which is an herbaceous plant which grows or lives in water.
(1) Note. An example of a plant found in this subclass is a water lily, which is a member of the genus Nymphaea, etc.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 343]    343Begonia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Begonia.
(1) Note. Included in this subclass are begonias of the commercial house plant type as well as types having conspicuous foliage and inconspicuous flowering.
(2) Note. Begonias are tropical and may have brightly colored and/or veined irregular leaves and waxy appearing single to fully double inconspicuous or attractive flowers of a variety of soft to vibrant colors.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 344]    344Rieger:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 343.  Begonia plant which is known and marketed generally as "tuberous" rather than "fibrous" begonia.
(1) Note. Rieger begonias botanically belong to species such as elatior, scotrana, tuberhybrida, hiemalis (Fotsch) and hybrids involving such species and usually have flowers of outstanding size, and/or number, and/or doubleness and/or color, or combinations of two or more.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 345]    345White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 344.  Rieger begonia plant having white petal color, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3785, 6216, and 7043.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 346]    346Yellow:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 344.  Rieger begonia plant having petal colors in the yellow range, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3474, 3750, and 4124.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 347]    347Orange or orange-red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 344.  Rieger begonia plant having petal colors in the orange to orange-red range, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3365, 3868, and 7039.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 348]    348Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 344.  Rieger begonia plant having petal colors in the pink range, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 5179, 5746, and 6435.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 349]    349Red or red-purple:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 344.  Rieger begonia plant having petal colors in the red to red-purple range, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 3904, 4210, and 6928.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 350]    350Achimenes:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Achimenes or is marketed as Achimenes.
(1) Note. Achimenes, also called Hot Water plant, is characterized as being perennial, having scaly, fleshy rhizomes, and simple, toothed leaves which may be fleshy and pubescent. It may have one to several axil or cyme, a five parted, tubular to salviform corolla, with a three part lower lip and a two part upper lobe.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 351]    351Exacum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Exacum.
(1) Note. Exacum is characterized as a biennial or perennial glabrous plant which is erect, densely branched, sessile, or branched simple, entire leaves; flowers cymose, leafy, forking or solitary, four to five lobed calyx bear corolla which are salviform to rotate, tubular-cylindric, and having four to five lobes which are ovate to oblong.
(2) Note. E. affine which is a popular house plant may also be called German violet or Persian violet.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 352]    352Bouvardia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Bouvardia.
(1) Note. Bouvardia is characterized by having ovate or lanceolate to oblong leaves which are entire to laciniate and have stipule sheathing. Flowers in terminal cymes or corymbs or solitary. Flower colors in white, yellow, pink, and red. Calyx tube is globose to companulate, with four lobes of linear shape; the corolla is tubular to salver shaped with four lobes.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 353]    353Hosta:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Hosta.
(1) Note. Hosta may also be known as Plantain lily. It is a member of the Liliaceae family having stolonaceous roots; rosette clump forming; long petioled, entire, generally heart-shaped leaf; and six-lobed companulate or funnelform, generally inconspicuous flowers on scapes.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 354]    354Gypsophila:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Gypsophila.
(1) Note. Gypsophila are also known as Baby’s Breath.
(2) Note. Gypsophila is characterized as an herb of rosette form arising from woody, perennial stock, with lanceolate to linear, alternate leaves on bolting stem; flowers are numerous, tiny, on spreading panicles; and calyx five-parted and five petals. Flowers may be double and are usually white or light pastel shades.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 355]    355Aster:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Aster.
(1) Note. Asters are characterized as herbaceous perennials with stalked lower, sessile higher leaves; discoid to radiate capitulums which are solitary to clustered in corymbs; any of a multitude of species and cross-species plants within the genus Aster.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.1]    356.1Petunia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Petunia, e.g., yellow petunias, etc.
(1) Note. Petunias are characterized as being annual or perennial plants having pubescent stems, solitary flowers in upper leaf axils; having five-lobed calyx and five-lobed salverform to funnel form usually equally lobed, complete, ruffled, or crimped corolla of solid colors, mixed or varied color patterns of violet, white, pale yellow, blue, red, or pink.
(2) Note. Petunia color for classification purposes is based on the base or ground color of the upper petal surface only of the "just developed" flower, the young flower or the just opened flower or the petunia flower "at opening". The color of the lower, reverse, or outer petal surface should be disregarded. The color of the venation and the throat color of the petunia should also be disregarded for classification placement purposes.
(3) Note. Examples of petunia plants provided for in this subclass include those which have petals which are yellow or petunias characterized by blossoms which are yellow on the upper petal surface (a color which resembles the hue of ripe lemons or the color of sulfur), as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 20119, 13968, and 18720.
(4) Note. For several of the indented subclasses, a petunia is classified according to the color as exemplified by the RHS (Royal Horticultural Society) Colour Chart designations.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.11]    356.11Intergeneric hybrid:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Intergeneric petunia hybrid is a plant which is formed between plants of two different genera, one of which is of the genus Petunia.
(1) Note. An intergeneric hybrid is indicated by the symbol X before the genus name, e.g., PetuniaXCalibrachoa hybrida, etc., as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 16063 and 18824.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.12]    356.12Double or semi-double:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by blooms wherein the flowers have more than one single layer or more than one row of petals, as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 14324, 14227, 14509, 13534, 14179, 13490, 18364, 14491, 13489, 13834, 13787, and 14283.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.13]    356.13Multicolor:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by blooms which are bi-colored on the upper petal surface or have more than one color or which have blushes, patches, spots, splashing, striping, speckling, a marginal band, a petal edge band of a distinct color, or other patterns of two or more distinct colors on the upper petal surface as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 17628, 19411, 18219, 16386, 11352, and 16810.
(1) Note. For classification purposes, the color of the petal venation, the inside petal throat color, and the color of the underside, lower, or the outer petal surface should be disregarded. Classification in this subclass is based on the presence of more than one distinct color on the upper base surface of the petals only.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.14]    356.14Green:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by blooms which are green on the upper petal surface, as typified by U.S. plant patent no. 18590.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.15]    356.15White:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by blooms which are white on the upper petal surface (a color comparable to fresh snow; a neutral or achromatic color of highest brilliance; the lightest gray), as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 15122, 16392, 18089, and 10953.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.16]    356.16Blue or violet-blue:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by blooms which are blue or violet-blue on the upper petal surface as exemplified by RHS groups N89 through 110 as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 11006, 19179, and 19219.

SEE OR SEARCH THIS CLASS, SUBCLASS:

356.21,for petunia plants with a red-purple base petal coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by red-purple RHS groups 57 through 73.
356.22,for petunia plants with a red-purple base petal coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by red-purple RHS groups 74 or N74.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.17]    356.17Light purple as exemplified by RHS groups 75 or 76:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by a light purple coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by RHS groups 75 or 76 as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 8489, 11713, 18624, and 18594.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.18]    356.18Purple as exemplified by RHS groups 77, N77, 78, N78, 79, or N79:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by a purple coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by RHS groups 77, N77, 78, N78, 79, or N79 as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 12141, 19216, 18153, 14007, and 18608.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.19]    356.19Purple-violet as exemplified by RHS groups 80, N80, 81, N81, 82, or N82:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by a purple-violet coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by RHS groups 80, N80, 81, N81, 82, or N82, as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 10279, 17198, 15310, and 16543.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.2]    356.2Violet as exemplified by RHS groups 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, N87, 88, or N88:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by a violet coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by RHS groups 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, N87, 88, or N88, as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 3510, 13543, 15456, 18319, 19001, 19132, and 20115.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.21]    356.21Red-purple as exemplified by RHS groups 57 through 73:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by a red-purple coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by RHS groups 57 through 73 as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 10355, 12139, 14278, 18719, 6899, 9341, 13383, 12805, 14272, 18497, and 18698.

SEE OR SEARCH THIS CLASS, SUBCLASS:

356.16,for petunia plants with a blue or violet-blue base petal coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by blue or violet-blue RHS groups N89 through 110.
356.17,for petunia plants with a light purple base petal coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by light purple RHS groups 75 or 76.
356.18,for petunia plants with a purple base petal coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by purple RHS groups 77, N77, 78, N78, 79, or N79.
356.19,for petunia plants with a purple-violet base petal coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by purple-violet RHS groups 80, N80, 81, N81, 82, or N82.
356.2,for petunia plants with a violet base petal coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by violet RHS groups 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, N87, 88, or N88.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.22]    356.22Red-purple as exemplified by RHS groups 74 or N74:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by red-purple coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by RHS groups 74 or N74 as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 6915, 9409, 10287, 13979, and 15342.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 356.23]    356.23Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 356.1.  Petunia plants characterized by red coloration on the upper petal surface as exemplified by RHS groups 36 through 56 as typified by U.S. plant patent nos. 10234, 11696, 18804, and 19215.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 357]    357Gerbera:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Gerbera.
(1) Note. Gerbera is also known as Transvaal daisy or Barberton daisy.
(2) Note. Gerberas are characterized as having hairy, basal rosette, entire to dentate or pinnately lobed petiolate leaves ascending to spreading to form mounded specimens; capitulums are radiate, solitary on long peduncles, densely, doubly ray flowered, blending to disc florets of same to contrasting coloration.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 358]    358Limonium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Limonium.
(1) Note. Limonium is also known as statice, sea lavender, and marsh rosemary.
(2) Note. These plants have a simple, entire, or pennatifid, basal rosetting or are clustered at axils. The calyx is tubular with a five-lobed tubular corolla connate only at the base.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 359]    359Helichrysum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Helichrysum.
(1) Note. This plant is also known as the Everlasting flower.
(2) Note. Helichrysum is described as capitulum radiate, discoid, solitary, or several often in a corymb. Phyllaries in few to many, imbricate series, rigid, scarious, white, variously colored, few to many flowers usually in shades of yellow.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 360]    360Osteospermum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Osteospermum.
(1) Note. These plants have alternate, entire, toothed pennatifid or pinnatisect foliage; radiate capitulum; few to many solitary terminals or may have loose umbellate or corymbose panicles.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 361]    361Eryngium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Eryngium.
(1) Note. Eryngium plants are commonly called eryngo or sea holly.
(2) Note. These plants are characterized as perennials, flower stem is ascending and branching, leaves basal, entire to three-pinnatisect, linear-lanceolate to ovate, coriaceous, membranous, petillate or sessile, and sometimes spiny. Flowers are small, packed involucral bracts and spiny.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 362]    362Anigozanthos:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Anigozanthos.
(1) Note. This plant is also known as Kangaroo Paw, Cat’s Paw, or Australian Sword Lily.
(2) Note. This plant is a perennial and is characterized as having leaves narrow, mostly basal; flowers in one-sided woolly racemes, hairy inside; and the tube long and flaring, slightly irregular.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 363]    363Scaevola:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Scaevola.
(1) Note. There are more than 90 species in this genus and they are characterized by having solitary flowers from leaf axils or in few flowered cymes; corolla tube is slit to the base on the upper side; lobes are subequal, spreading, wings equal; and five stamens.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 364]    364Pathiphyllum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Spathiphyllum.
(1) Note. Spathiphyllum is commonly known as Spathe Flower.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 365]    365Anthurium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Anthurium.
(1) Note. Anthurium is commonly known as Tail Flower.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 366]    366White or cream:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 365.  Anthurium plant which has a spathe and spadix of white or cream coloration, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8129, 8131, and 8821.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 367]    367Pink:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 365.  Anthurium plant which has a spathe and spadix of pink coloration, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 9450 and 9669.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 368]    368Purple, purple-red, or lavender:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 365.  Anthurium plant which has a spathe and spadix of purple, purple-red, or lavender coloration, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 8375, 9686, and 9449.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 369]    369Red:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 365.  Anthurium plant which has a spathe and spadix of red coloration, as typified by U.S. plant patent Nos. 4375, 4376, and 7044.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 370]    370Bromeliad:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Bromeliaceae.
(1) Note. Bromeliad plants may be epiphytic, have stiff sword-like, pointed, and sharp leaves, and may have strikingly colored, patterned foliage and spectacular, complex vibrantly colored flowers. They are widely used as house plants.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 371]    371Guzmania:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 370.  Bromeliad plant which belongs to the genus Guzmania.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 372]    372Cactus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Cactaceae.
(1) Note. Cacti are generally characterized by a high tolerance to drought, thick fleshy appendages, thick waxy cuticles covering exposed plant parts, often the presence of needles, and normally slow growth. They may also have showy flowers such as the Christmas cactus.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 373]    373HERBACEOUS ORNAMENTAL FOLIAGE PLANT:
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which is herbaceous and principally characterized by and grown for its ornamental foliage.
(1) Note. The plants in this and the indented subclasses are normally plants which are commercially marketed as "house plants".
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 374]    374Syngonium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genera Syngonium Schott or Nephthytis Hort.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 375]    375Calathea:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genus Calathea.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 376]    376Aglaonema:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genus Araceae and is commercially marketed under the name Aglaonema .
(1) Note. Some species of Aglaonema are known as Chinese evergreen.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 377]    377Schefflera:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genus Schefflera.
(1) Note. Schefflera is commonly known as Umbrella Tree.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 378]    378Dieffenbachia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genus Dieffenbachia.
(1) Note. These plants are characterized by having thick, succulent stems with distinct, leaf sheaf defined segments at the nodes, and attractive, patterned variegations in the foliage.
(2) Note. Dieffenbachia is also known as dumb-cane.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 379]    379Fern:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which is a flowerless, seedless, vascular plant of the class Filicinae.
(1) Note. Ferns have frond-like foliage and normally or commonly have a multitude of opposite leaflets and reproduce by spores.
(2) Note. Included in this subclass are Staghorn and Bird Nest ferns which have large simple fronds of various shapes without leaflets.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 380]    380Hoya:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genus Hoya.
(1) Note. This is a large family encompassing plants of a myriad of habits, sizes, and origins such as desert or forest.
(2) Note. Some species may have foliage, but foliage may be seasonal (i.e., on new growth) and temporary.
(3) Note. Some species may exhibit large or showy, colorful flowers and/or bear edible fruit.
(4) Note. Hoyas are characterized as forming vines with large, green, and frequently variegated by marginal cream coloration, thick leaves which curve inwardly toward the undersurface.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 381]    381Philodendron:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genus Philodendron.
(1) Note. These plants are characterized by having a vining habit and being a climbing tropical, tender vine.
(2) Note. Plants in this subclass vary in leaf shape, leaf and leaf petiole coloration, leaf size and leaf coloration, and may vary in ploidy.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 382]    382Sansevieria:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genus Sansevieria.
(1) Note. These plants are characterized by having short to long, thick and stiff lance-shaped leaves which are frequently patterned in various shades of green and which may be marginally variegated with yellow, and which normally spread by rhizomatous appendages. Sansevieria is normally grown as a house plant.
(2) Note. This plant may be referred to as Mother-in-law’s tongue or Snake plant.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 383]    383Dracaena or Cordyline:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 373.  Plant which belongs to the genera Dracaena or Cordyline.
(1) Note. Cordylines differ only slightly from Dracaenas and are sometimes listed as such.
(2) Note. These plants are characterized as having linear, strap-like foliage and may have highly attractive and notably long-lasting flower presentations.
(3) Note. The Dracaena is sometimes called the Corn plant. A popular variety of Cordyline is the Hawaiian ti plant.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 384]    384GRASS (e.g., pampas, elephant, etc.):
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which belongs to the family Gramineae.
(1) Note. These plants have narrow leaves, hollow and jointed stems, and spikes of clusters of membranous flowers borne in small spiklets.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 385]    385Sugar cane:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 384.  Plant which belongs to the genus and species Saccharum officinarum.
(1) Note. Sugar cane is tall and has thick tough stems.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 386]    386Perennial corn:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 384.  Plant which is perennial and which has within its genetic background at least one of the antecedents of modern corn (i.e., Zea mays).
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 387]    387Salt grass:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 384.  Plant which belongs to the genus Distichles.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 388]    388Recreational turf or pasture grass:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 384.  Plant which is normally used as a cover for a tract of ground.
(1) Note. These grasses may be adapted for either recreational or pasture use.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 389]    389Bermuda grass:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 388.  Grass which belongs to the genus Cynodon.
(1) Note. Plants included in this subclass may be members of Cynodon dactylon, Cynodon transvaalensis, or interspecific hybrids within the genus Cynodon.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 390]    390Zoysia grass:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 388.  Grass which belongs to the genus Zoysia.
(1) Note. Plants included in this subclass may be members of Zoysia japonica, Zoysia matrella, or interspecific hybrids within the genus Zoysia.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 391]    391Buffalo grass:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 388.  Grass which belongs to Buchloe dactyloides and is of any ploidy level of a plant within this species.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 392]    392St. Augustine grass:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 388.  Grass which belongs to the genus Stenotaprum.
(1) Note. Included in this subclass is the species S. secundatum or related species which share the same market class.
(2) Note. This grass is noted to have thick, heavy stems and leaves of normally two spikes per node, aggressive growth, forming heavy, strong ground covers; a spreading grass.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 393]    393Bluegrass:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 388.  Grass which belongs to the genus Poa.
(1) Note. A common species member of this genus is P. pratensis.
(2) Note. Bluegrass is characterized as a bunch grass with some ability to spread due to rhizomes and producing seed largely to predominantly through apomixis; having fine, dense, lush foliage of pleasing green to blue green hues, and forming abundant seed panicels on slender, strong spikes.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 394]    394MUSHROOM:
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant which is a multicellular fleshy fungi of the class Basidiomycetes, characteristically having an umbrella-shaped cap borne on a stalk.
(1) Note. The entire cap and stalk of the mushroom are composed of hyphae. The above ground portion of the mushroom is the fruiting body.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 395]    395MISCELLANEOUS:
 This subclass is indented under the class definition.  Plant not provided for above.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 397]    397Aconitum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Aconitum.
(1) Note. The genus Aconitumis part of the Ranunculaceae family and may also be referred to as Monk s Hood. Aconitum plants include about 100 species of annual, biennial, or perennial herbs with single galeate (helmet or hood-shaped) flowers arranged in racemes or racemose panicles and known as poisonous plants largely growing in areas of damp meadows and woodlands in mountain areas.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 398]    398Agapanthus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Agapanthus.
(1) Note. The genus Agapanthus is part of the Liliaceae family. Agapanthusplants have inflorescence with many flowered terminal umbels of large tubular to campanulate florets of dark violet or deep blue to white in coloration.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 399]    399Agastache:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Agastache.
(1) Note. The genus Agastache is part of the Labiatae family and may also be referred to as Mexican Hyssop or Giant Hyssop. Agastache plants include some 20 species of aromatic upright or procumbent perennials with branching stems and spreading rootstocks; with leaves that are usually petiolate or subsessile, ovate, or deltoid-ovate with margins crenate-serrate, or rarely, with leaves that are lanceolate or linear with margins entire, glabrous to pubescent; with inflorescence spicate or narrowly paniculate, flowers in dense sessile verticals, subtending bracts often conspicuous; with corolla that are red, orange, rose, violet, blue or white, without hairs on the throat of the 2-lipped tube. Agastache spp can be successfully cultivated in sheltered, well-drained sites.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 400]    400Ageratum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Ageratum.
(1) Note. The genus Ageratum is part of the Compositae family and includes some 43 species of annual and perennial herbs and shrubs with stems erect or creeping, sometimes branched; leaves orbicular to linear, usually acute, entire or divided, often pilose, especially on veins, sometimes petiolate; capitula discoid, solitary or in a panicle of up to 30 or more, forming a round-topped cluster; florets tubular, with 5 blue, grey, or white lobes, erect or spreading, giving the flower head a tassel-like appearance. A frost-tender genus grown for its brush-like, fluffy blooms borne over a long period (in commonly grown cultivars often carried throughout summer until first frost) and for the fastness of the wide range of clear colors, although some of those with white flowers fade to a dirty brown unless regularly deadheaded.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 401]    401Ajuga:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Ajuga.
(1) Note. The genus Ajuga is part of the Labiatae family and may also be referred to as Carpet Bugle. Ajuga plants include some 40 species of low growing annual, or perennial evergreen herbs grown for use as an ornamental groundcover for the landscape and bearing whorls of usually blue flowers above the foliage in spring and early summer.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 402]    402Amaryllis or Hippeastrum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Amaryllisor Hippeastrum.
(1) Note. The genus Amaryllis is part of the Amaryllidaceae family. Amaryllisplants are bulbous perennial herbs with strap-shaped leaves and broad funnel-shaped single flowers arranged in umbels.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 403]    403Anagallis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Anagallis.
(1) Note. The genus Anagallis is part of the Primlaceae family and may also be referred to as Pimpernel. Anagallis plants are low-growing and creeping glabrous herb plants of open meadows or bogs, used in the garden for edging borders, summer color in rock gardens, and as potted plants for winter or spring color.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 404]    404Angelonia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Angelonia.
(1) Note. The genus Angelonia is part of the Scrophulariaceae family. Angelonia plants have single bilabiate flowers in leaf axils or arranged on terminal racemes.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 405]    405Anthemis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Anthemis.
(1) Note. The genus Anthemis is part of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Dog Fennel. Cultivated species are grown for their daisy flowers held on slender stalks above the finely divided foliage.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 406]    406Argyranthemum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Argyranthemum.
(1) Note. The genus Argyranthemum is part of the Compositae family. Argyranthemumplants have a single daisy composite inflorescence form with ligulate ray florets; disc and ray florets develop acropetally on a capitulum; and inflorescences are held upright and perpendicular to the peduncles.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 407]    407Astilbe:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Astilbe.
(1) Note. The genus Astilbe is part of the Saxifragaceae family and may be commercially marketed as Spiraea. Astilbe plants are characterized as perennial, deciduous herbs, forming dense clumps with rhizomes branching below ground, with small, numerous flowers arranged in broadly pyramidal, branching panicles.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 408]    408Astrantia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Astrantia.
(1) Note. The genus Astrantia is part of the Umbelliferae family and may also be referred to as Masterwort. Astrantia plants occur in alpine meadows and woods and are grown for their starry flowerheads formed by numerous, single, minute, upright, campanulate flowers of the central umbel surrounded by a decorative collar of papery, showy involucral bracts and carried on erect, wiry stems.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 409]    409Bergenia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Bergenia.
(1) Note. The genus Bergenia is part of the Saxifragaceae family and includes 8 species of perennial rhizomatous herbs occurring in damp, rocky woodland or meadows and valued for bold, evergreen groundcover and early flowers in scapose cymes.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 410]    410Bidens:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Bidens.
(1) Note. The genus Bidens is also commonly known as a member of the Compositae family and includes Tickseed, Beggar’s Ticks, Stick-Tight, Bur-Marigold, Pitchforks, Spanish Needles, etc. Bidens plants are characterized as erect, annual or perennial herbs or shrubs with daisy-type composite inflorescences. They have disc and ray florets developed acropetally on a capitulum and inflorescences displayed above and beyond the foliage on wiry peduncles.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 411]    411Brachycome:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Brachycome.
(1) Note. The genus Brachycome is commonly known as a member of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Swan River Daisy. Brachycome plants include about 70 species of annual or perennial herbs characterized by daisy-type composite inflorescences with ray and disc florets developed acropetally on a capitulum held above the foliage on erect peduncles.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 412]    412Brunnera:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Brunnera.
(1) Note. The genus Brunnera is part of the Boraginaceae family and includes 3 species of rhizomatous perennial herbs with erect stems, setose or glandular-pubescent; inflorescence a terminal panicle; bracts absent; corolla purple or blue, small, rotate, lobes ovate-orbicular. Brunnera macrophylla is a useful groundcover in the woodland garden, in shaded borders and in waterside plantings, bearing loose sprays of delicate, clear blue flowers in spring, which resemble those of forget-me-nots. The foliage increases in size after flowering, providing weed-smothering cover; the leaf edges assume their characteristic undulations as leaf size increases, giving massed plantings potential for textural contrasts.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 413]    413Calibrachoa:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Calibrachoa characterized by salverform, trumpet-shaped solitary flowers.
(1) Note. Calibrachoa is part of the genus of plants in the Solanaceae (nightshade) family. Calibrachoa plants are weak evergreen perennials with a sprawling habit and have a multitude of small (miniature) petunia-type flowers, but unlike the petunia, Calibrachoa plants will not get leggy, turn to wet tissue paper after a hard rain, or melt in the heat and humidity of summer. Calibrachoa plants have tiny bell-shaped blooms and cascading form, and the petals are various shades of cherry, red, rose, violet, orange, pink, peach, white, plum, purple, blue, and yellow that produce hundreds of eye-catching flowers in the greenhouse, garden, or containers. Depending on the variety, Calibrachoa plants can be trailing or weeping with a height of four to six inches or spreading/upright resulting in a mounded habit that will grow to a height of 10 to 15 inches. This mounded type of Calibrachoaplant creates more central growth resulting in blossoms that completely cover the plant; all varieties spread from 20 to 30 inches and are commonly used in locations that take advantage of its trailing/spreading habit and grow well in hanging baskets, patio planters, and window boxes. Calibrachoa plants are used for garden beds, either massed or in combination. They bloom well in full sun but will tolerate light afternoon shade in well-drained soil with average moisture; shade reduces flowering.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 414]    414Campanula:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Campanula.
(1) Note. The genus Campanula is commonly known as a member of the Campanulaceae family and may also be referred to as Bellflower. Campanula plants include about 300 species of annual, biennial, or perennial herbs characterized with a campanulate corolla and with inflorescences that are paniculate, racemose, or capitate, or with flowers occasionally solitary.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 415]    415Canna:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Canna.
(1) Note. The genus Canna is also commonly known as a member of the Cannaceae family and includes about 9 species of rhizomatous perennial herbs characterized as exotic and often with brilliantly colored orchid-like flowers with large oval leaves that spiral up the stem that may be green, bronze, or purple.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 416]    416Cleome:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Cleome.
(1) Note. The genus Cleome is commonly known as a member of the Capparidaceae family and includes some 150 species of annual or perennial herbs, glabrous to glandular-pubescent; leaves alternate, palmatifid usually exstipulate; leaflets 3 to 7, entire to serrulate; inflorescence a raceme, terminal, or lateral, 1- to many flowered, usually bracteate; sepals free, equal, persistent or deciduous; petals 4, subequal, usually unguiculate. Cleomespp. are grown for their long-lasting and unusual spider-shaped flowers, opening from the base of the inflorescence upwards, and carried over long periods from summer into autumn; the petals may curl up on hot sunny days and open fully in the cool of the evening.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 417]    417Coreopsis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Coreopsis.
(1) Note. The genus Coreopsis is commonly known as a member of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Tickseed. Coreopsis plants bear long stemmed daisy-type inflorescences in profusion over long periods in the summer and are a rich nectar and pollen source for honey bees. Coreopsis plants are particularly valued for their clean bright and rich yellows and are suitable for the sunny herbaceous and cut flower border; blooms often live exceptionally long in water.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 418]    418Cosmos:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Cosmos.
(1) Note. The genus Cosmos is commonly known as a member of the Compositae family and includes about 26 species of annual, perennial herbs, rarely subshrubs, glabrous or hairy; stems erect or ascending, often furrowed, naked or pubescent; leaves opposite, undivided, lobed or 1-3-pinnatisect, dark green above, often paler beneath, glabrous or hairy, sessile or petiolate; capitula medium to rather large, 1 to many, usually radiate, terminal on long peduncles, in loose corymbs; involucre hemispherical; receptacle flat, scaly; phyllaries in 2 series; ray florets in one series, sterile, entire or subdentate, pink or violet to black-purple or blood-red, more rarely deep orange, yellow or white; disc florets hermaphrodite, fertile, tubular, purple, blood-red or yellow. A frost tender genus, the annual species grown in beds and borders produces long-stemmed flowers for cutting over long periods in the summer and early autumn.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 419]    419Crocosmia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Crocosmia.
(1) Note. The genus Crocosmia is commonly known as a member of the Iridaceae family and may also be referred to as Montbretia. Crocosmia includes some 7 species of deciduous, perennial monocots, to 1.25 cm.; circular, flattened, ringed, ivory corms to 2.5 cm diameter, borne on short slender stolons; linear leaves, acuminate, often slightly recurved, in two ranks, from apex of corm and sheathing vase of flowering stem, erect, glabrous or pubescent, ribbed or plicate; flowers above leaves, semi-opposite along simple or branching spikes, erect or horizontal; perianth yellow to vermilion, often with darker markings, to 6 cm, slender, tubular, curving downwards, spreading as lobes, obtuse, to 2 cm across. Crocosmia spp. are grown for their brightly colored, funnel-shaped flowers carried on arching, wiry stems and are especially valued for their late summer blooming. They grow in damp habitats.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 420]    420Cuphea:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Cuphea.
(1) Note. The genus Cuphea is commonly known as a member of the Lythraceae family and includes 260 species of annual or short-lived perennial herbs or subshrubs, to 2m. Cuphea plants are branched or unbranched; viscid or downy stem; opposite or whorled leaves, upper leaves diminishing to inflorescence bracts, ovate to lanceolate, elliptic or linear, entire or slightly toothed; inflorescence a terminal or axillary, leafy raceme or panicle; pedicels with 2 opposite bracteoles; flowers 6-merous, zygomorphic, 1-3 per node; floral tube cylindric, sometimes flared, green, violet, red, bronze, yellow, pink or white, 12-nerved, base gibbous or spurred, lobes 6, lowest often longest, with or without 6 alternating smaller appendages, sometimes with red-purple or yellow hairs; petals absent or to 6, spathulate to obovate, equal or subequal, alternate with lobes, minute, to 12 mm, crumpled, light pink to dark purple, red, yellow or white. C. ignea and C.Xpurpurea, make tolerant, long-flowering bedding plants with small but showy, abundantly produced flowers and neat foliage, often covered in sticky glandular hairs.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 421]    421Curcuma:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Curcuma.
(1) Note. The genus Curcuma is also commonly known as a member of the Zingiberaceae family. Curcuma plants are short rhizomatous perennials adapted to areas of seasonal drought in the monsoonal teak forests of Indomalaysia and coastal brush forests of tropical Australia and grown, otherwise, for their showy, bracted basal inflorescences.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 422]    422Delosperma:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Delosperma.
(1) Note. The genus Delosperma is also commonly known as a member of the Aizoaceae family. Delosperma plants are mat-forming, compact or laxly branched, erect or with primary branches ascending, prostrate, creeping, herbaceous or shrubby, or with annual shoots from a tuberous or woody caudex. Delosperma leaves are succulent, cylindric or semicylindric, or flat and variously shaped. Flowers are single or solitary rotate flowers in a lax cyme, typically with one flower per terminal, open during the day and with numerous petals.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 423]    423Delphinium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Delphinium.
(1) Note. The genus Delphinium is commonly known as a member of the Ranunculaceae family and may also be referred to as Larkspur. Delphinium plants bear inflorescences of a showy spike or racemes that may sometimes be paniculate and contain few to many flowers on erect and sometimes branching stems. The genus Delphinium is unusual in that all three primary colors are represented in different species. The tall hybrids with their long spikes are available in a wide range of colors including purple, mauve, pink, white, and cream as well as varying shades of blue. In Europe, they are grown as perennials but are treated as annuals in California and regions of similar climate.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 424]    424Dianella:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Dianella.
(1) Note. The genus Dianella is commonly known as a member of the Liliaceae family and may also be referred to as Flax Lily. Dianella plants include 25-30 species of fibrous-rooted, perennial herbs that grow to 150 cm; stems often becoming erect, to 2m, slender, scarred by leaf sheaths and bearing a terminal fan of leaves; leaves radical or on stems, 2-ranked, grasslike, to 150X3cm, sessile, sheathing, linear-lanceolate to broadly ensiform, venation parallel, margins and keel rough or smooth; inflorescences loosely paniculate, to 60 cm, spreading, sometimes clustered, on drooping pedicels; flowers regular, bisexual, 3-merous, hypogynous; tepals free, 2 whorls of 3, 3-8-nerved, to 2 cm across, deep blue, pale blue, green-white, purple-white, or white. Dianella plants are evergreen and rhizomatous usually occurring in nature in subtropical and warm-temperate woodland habitats, Dianellaspp. are grown for their clumps of attractive grass-like, rough-edged leaves and summer-flowering panicles of small blue flowers, white in D. intermedia;D. tasmanica begins to flower early in the year so that by summer it will bear persistent, bright blue berries. The fruits of other species are equally spectacular.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 425]    425Diascia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Diascia.
(1) Note. The genus Diascia is also commonly known as a member of the Scrophulariaceae family. Diascia plants include 50 species of annual and perennial herbs with solitary zygomorphic flowers arranged on terminal racemes with five modified petals fused at the base and lateral spurs containing dark glands. Diasciaplantsare sun-loving plants grown for their dense spikes of colorful flowers, borne over a long flowering season, sometimes from early summer through first frosts.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 426]    426Dicentra:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Dicentra.
(1) Note. The genus Dicentra is commonly known as a member of the Fumariaceae family and may also be referred to as Bleeding Heart. Dicentra plants include 19 species of annual or perennial deciduous herbs from taproots, bulblets, tubers, or rhizomes. They are largely plants of woodland fringe or damp mountain soils, grown for their flowers and lacey, often glaucous, foliage. Dicentra flowers are borne in panicles, racemes or corymbs, and are solitary, axillary or leaf-opposed, pendulous, and heart-shaped in outline.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 427]    427Dimorphotheca:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Dimorphotheca.
(1) Note. The genus Dimorphotheca is commonly known as a member of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Sun Marigold. It is a moderately drought-tolerant genus that is valued for the profusion of beautiful daisy flowers carried over mounds of aromatic foliage, sometimes blooming as quickly as nine weeks from sowing, then throughout summer until first frosts. Dimorphotheca plants include about 7 species of glabrous to glandular-hairy herbs or shrubs with daisy-type composite inflorescences displayed above the foliage, upright on long peduncles arising from leaf axils with disc and ray florets developed acropetally on a capitulum.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 428]    428Echinacea:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Echinacea.
(1) Note. The genus Echinacea is commonly known as a member of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Cone Flower. Echinacea plants include about 9 species of rhizomatous perennial herbs occurring in dry habitats in open woodland and prairies. They are grown in herbaceous and cut flower borders and in native plant collections for their large, late summer daisies with the distinctive and prominent central cone of disc florets. Echinaceaplants have terminal and axillary composite inflorescences held mostly above and beyond the foliage on strong peduncles with disc and ray florets developed acropetally on a capitulum and disc florets massed at the center. Echinaceaplants will withstand heat with high humidity, drought, partial shade, and temperatures as low as – 15 to – 20 C/5 F to 4 F and below.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 429]    429Epimedium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Epimedium.
(1) Note. The genus Epimedium is commonly known as a member of the Berberidaceae family and may also be referred to as Bishop s Hat or Bishop s Mitre. Epimedium plants include around 25 species of herbaceous, rhizomatous perennials with irregularly branching rhizome, creeping, covered in thin, brown bracts; 2-ternately divided leaves, rarely simple or more divided; stipules forming a sheath around the base of the petiole; petiole round in section; leaflets cordate at base, pointed at tip, margin spiny, sometimes entire; flowering stem naked to 6-leaved; inflorescence few- to many-flowered; pedicel subtended by a bract; flowers glabrous, white and red, yellow or violet; sepals 8, in 2 sets of 4, the outer set 5 mm, early deciduous, the inner set petaloid, spreading; petals 4, nectariferous and short. The rather slow-growing Epimedium plants provide excellent groundcover and are from the moist woodlands of the northern hemisphere. The heart-shaped leaves are particularly attractive; in some cultivars, both the new spring and the autumnal leaves are tinged russet-bronze, and the flowers, the shape of a bishop s mitre, float daintily on wiry stems above the leaves. In late winter, deciduous Epimediumspp. must be clipped clean of the previous season s growth to ensure that the flowers can be seen.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 430]    430Felicia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Felicia.
(1) Note. The genus Felicia is commonly known as a member of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Blue Marguerite, Blue Daisy, or Kingfisher Daisy. Felicia plants include about 83 species of annual to perennial herbs, dwarf subshrubs, and shrubs. The genus Felicia is a frost-tender genus, does not thrive in hot humid conditions, and is prone to rot if cold and damp. Feliciaplants have disc and ray florets of capitulate radiate that are often solitary.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 431]    431Gaillardia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Gaillardia.
(1) Note. The genus Gaillardia is also commonly known as a member of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Blanket Flower. Gaillardia plants include about 30 species of annual, biennial, and perennial herbs which grow to about 90 cm.; leaves alternate or often radical, entire, toothed, or pinnatifid, base petiolate or sessile, more or less clasping, pubescent; capitula radiate, solitary; receptacle convex to subglobose; ray florets yellow to red, tipped with yellow or red-purple, sterile; disc florets tubular to campanulate, purple. Gaillardia plants are valued for their mid-summer flowers in a range of predominantly hot vibrant colors, from golden yellows and warm copper to rich burgundy; Gaillardia spp. are so prolific and long-blooming that they often exhaust themselves and may be short-lived as perennials. Most are excellent for cutting, especially if given the support of a grow-through mesh to ensure long straight stems.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 432]    432Gaura:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Gaura.
(1) Note. The genus Gaura is also commonly known as a member of the Onagraceae family with 21 species of annual, biennial or perennial herbs. Gaura flowers are solitary, slightly zygomorphic flowers that are arranged on elongated terminal and axillary panicles in leafless spikes. It is a fine, graceful plant for herbaceous borders, the wild garden or collections of native plants; valuable for the late-blooming, soft racemes of white, pale pink, or scarlet flowers produced continuously over a long period.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 433]    433Gentiana:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Gentiana.
(1) Note. The genus Gentiana is also commonly known as a member of the Gentianaceae family and includes about 400 species of annual, biennial, or perennial, erect, prostrate, decumbent or climbing herbs. Gentiana flowers are solitary or in elongate to capitate, cymes, axillary or terminal, erect or inclined, rarely nodding; corolla rotate, campanulate, tubular, funnel-shaped, salverform or clavate, 4-7 lobed, with interstitial webs or appendages (plicae), tube sometimes pleated, often striped outside and spotted within. Gentiana plants are widespread across cool temperate and alpine zones of the world, and most will thrive only in regions with cool summers. These plants are found in a wide range of habitats and soil types and exhibit a corresponding diversity of habit, size, and cultural requirements, so lending themselves to a number of situations in the garden. Their colors range from the deep and intense blues to which the genus has given its name to colors which include yellow, white, scarlet, and gold.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 434]    434Globba:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Globba.
(1) Note. The genus Globba is also commonly known as a member of the Zingiberaceae family and includes some 70 species of perennial herbs with slender fleshy rhizomes, fibrous roots, and reed-like leafy stems. The inflorescence of Globba is a pendulous terminal raceme, with showy bracts; flowers borne in cincinni on slender branchlets arising from axils of bracts and the lower flowers are often replaced with bulbils. Globba plants are slender, rhizomatous perennials from the shady forests of monsoonal areas in southeast Asia and northeast India; they are useful as groundcover under tropical shrubs and are easily grown in a medium-fertility, soil-based mix.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 435]    435Helenium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Helenium.
(1) Note. The genus Helenium is a part of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Sneezeweed and is said to be named for Helen of Troy. Helenium plants include about 40 species of annual, biennial, or perennial herbs. The inflorescences of Helenium are radiate or discoid capitula that may be solitary or in a corymb held above the foliage in strong erect peduncles. Disc and ray florets develop acropetally on a capitulum. Helenium plants are grown for the warm color range of their flowers with their prominent dark centers. Helenium is used for cutting and for the herbaceous border and offers large number of cultivars that are particularly valuable for the autumn border.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 436]    436Helianthus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Helianthus.
(1) Note. The genus Helianthus is a part of the Compositae family and includes about 70 species of showy annual to perennial herbs, often with fibrous or tuberous roots and rhizomes. The inflorescences of Helianthus are daisy-type borne on terminals above the foliage with disc and ray florets developing acropetally on a capitulum. Helianthus spp. are valued for their brilliant late summer flowers, which in many species last well when cut; most provide a useful nectar source for bees, and the larger-flowered cultivars of the sunflower are particularly valuable when the seeds ripen and attract finches and other seed-eating birds into the garden. The seed is of great economic importance as a source of vegetable oil, a masticatory, and a fodder crop.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 437]    437Heliopsis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Heliopsis.
(1) Note. The genus Heliopsis is a part of the Compositae family and includes about 13 species of branched, erect, perennial herbs and may also be referred to as Ox-eye. The inflorescences of Heliopsis are showy radiate capitula, with a single capitulum per terminal, comprising disc and ray florets. Heliopsis is noted for its ease of cultivation, extreme cold-hardiness, longevity, robust vigor, and the strong warm colors of the large daisy flowers from mid to late summer and autumn; the flowers also last reasonably well when cut.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 438]    438Heliotrope:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Heliotrope.
(1) Note. The genus Heliotrope is a part of the Boraginaceae family and may also be referred to as Heliotropium or Turnsole. Heliotrope plants include about 250 species of annual or perennial herbs, shrubs or undershrubs, usually villous. The inflorescences of Heliotrope are solitary, geminate, or ternate in scorpioid spikes or racemes with flowers of white, blue, purple, or sometimes yellow, and corolla form as tubular, cylindrical, or unfundibular. Heliotropiumspp. generally occur in dry, open habitats, especially on sandy soils and may be container grown where the delightful fragrance may be appreciated.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 439]    439Helleborus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Helleborus.
(1) Note. The genus Helleborus is part of the Ranunculaceae family and may also be referred to as Hellebore. Helleborus plants include 15 species of rhizomatous herbs. Helleborus rhizomes are usually stout, branching, with thick brown or black roots, or sometimes with erect or procumbent aerial stems; stems are herbaceous or persistent; herbaceous stems arising from rhizomes are surrounded by 2-3 sheaths and are leafless although bracts may resemble leaves; leaves are mostly basal arising from rhizomes, caulescent species borne on stems and falling to expose basal portion of stems, usually pedate, sometimes palmate, with 3 or more segments, often coriaceous, venation prominent below, sometimes pubescent, margins coarsely dentate or spiny-toothed, rarely entire; flowers rarely solitary, usually a few in loose cymes, sometimes many in a paniculate cyme, subtended by leaflike bracts, usually pendent or horizontal, flat to campanulate, actinomorphic, hermaphrodite, parts inserted spirally; outer whorl of 5 perianth segments, overlapping white or green to purple, persistent, becoming green after anthesis; inner whorl of to 32 tubular to funnel-shaped nectarines, green or deep purple, yellow, pink or almost black, caducous. Helleborusspp. and hybrids are long-lasting and are striking late winter to early spring flowering plants in an infinite variety of earthy whites, greens, yellows and deep purples, often with flushing and speckling in contrasting hues. The strong, sculptured, evergreen foliage adds an architectural element in borders too small for shrubs.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 440]    440Heuchera:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Heuchera.
(1) Note. The genus Heuchera is a part of the Saxifragaceae family and may also be referred to as Alum Root or Coral Bells. Heuchera plants include some 55 species of herbaceous, evergreen, perennial herbs which grow to 70 cm. with woody, often branching rootstock; leaves usually basal, tuft-forming, rounded, cordate, dentate, broadly 5-9-lobed, mottled when young; petiole slender; inflorescence a slender, scapose raceme or panicle; flowers small; sepals fused at base in a bell, saucer-shaped, 5-lobed above; petals 5 or absent, often shorter than sepals. Heuchera is used as evergreen groundcover in the woodland garden or damp, sunny, border edges, valued for its foliage interest (many have marbled leaves) and graceful flowering spikes in subtle shades of coral pink and green. H. Purple Palace is one of the most striking small herbaceous perennials; its dark foliage and delicate white flowers commend it as a contrast plant for mixed borders, preferably on slightly damp soils.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 441]    441XHeucherella:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus XHeucherella.
(1) Note. The genus XHeucherella is a part of the Saxifragaceae family of perennial herbs and grows to 45 cm. with leaves to 13 cm., orbicular, stalked, shallowly lobed, hispid throughout, light green, mottled brown when young, becoming dark green with age, bronze in autumn; flowering stem to 40 cm; panicles loose, slender; flowers small, pink; calyx fused into a pink cup; petals 4mm., just exceeding sepals in length. XHeucherellaplants are clump-forming hybrids with a neat, ground-covering habit and good autumn color.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 442]    442Hypericum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Hypericum.
(1) Note. The genus Hypericum is a part of the Guttiferae family and includes over 400 species of small trees, shrubs, or herbs, evergreen or deciduous, with pale (pellucid or amber) and often dark (black or occasionally red) glands (and/or canals), glabrous or sometimes with simple hairs on stems, leaves and/or sepals. Hypericum leaves are paired or sometimes 3-4-whorled, sessile or shortly stalked; flowers are bisexual, solitary and terminal or in terminal and sometimes axillary dichasial to monochasial cymes, sometimes in a dichasium replaced by flowering pseudo-dichotomous branches. Sometimes, Hypericum may be commercially used as cut stems with fruits.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 443]    443Kniphofia or Tritoma:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Kniphofia or Tritoma.
(1) Note. The genus Kniphofia, named after a German botanist, J.H. Kniphof, is a part of the Lilaceae or Aloeaceae family and includes about 68 species of perennial herbs with short thick rhizomes forming large clumps or having a few crowns from which arise clusters of linear to grasslike leaves, often fleshy, sometimes strap-like, sometimes keeled, rarely caulescent. Kniphofiascapes are erect, slender, usually exceeding leaves, bearing in the apical quarter a dense or lax spike-like raceme with tubular-cylindric to funnel-shaped flowers. Kniphofia plants are summer and autumn flowering, generally sturdy perennials for the sunny border, valued for their strong form and stout spikes of often brilliantly colored flowers which last well when cut.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 444]    444Lamium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Lamium.
(1) Note. The genus Lamium is part of the Labiatae family and may also be referred to as Dead Nettle. Lamium plants include some 50 species of perennial or annual herbs; with stems often stoloniferous and creeping at base, glabrous to pubescent; leaves petiolate, opposite, ovate to kidney-shaped, base usually cordate, rugose; flowers in to 12-flowered verticillasters; corolla 2-lipped, upper lip hooded, arched, ovate to oblong, lower lip spreading, 3-lobed, cordate to obovate, lateral lobes reduced, occasionally appendaged, middle lobe short-petiolate, obovate. Lamiumplants are useful ground-covering plants, particularly the silver-leaved forms of L. maculatum (the silver coloration is due to air-filled blisters below the leaf surface) and L. galeobdolon are several of the most commonly encountered groundcover plants in cool temperate gardens.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 445]    445Lavandula:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Lavandula.
(1) Note. The genus Lavandula is part of the Labiatae family and may also be referred to as Lavender, which has long been used as a fragrant wash. Lavandulaplants include 28 species of aromatic shrubs and subshrubby perennials with branched stems that are erect or spreading; leaves linear-oblong, simple and entire or dentate to pinnate or bipinnate margins usually revolute; inflorescence a terminal, long-stalked, verticillate spike, simple or branched at base; bracts differing distinctly from leaves; corolla 2-lipped, usually purple or blue, sometimes white or pink, upper lip 2-lobed, lower lip 3-lobed, lobes equal. Lavandulaplants are aromatic shrubs grown for their ornamentation and perfume. Oil of lavender has been extracted from several species for its scent and antiseptic properties. Several species because of their high nectar content are grown as bee plants. All lavenders are found in exposed, usually parched, hot, rocky situations. Although often found on calcareous soils, lavenders are not affected by different soil types but prefer well-drained positions to damp waterlogged ones during winter. English Lavender plants do not live very long and become unshapely in fewer than 10 years. They may be trimmed back after 3-4 years to prolong their shape, but in time will need to be replaced by young plants.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 446]    446Leschenaultia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Leschenaultia.
(1) Note. The genus Leschenaultia is a part of the Goodeniaceae family and includes some 24 species of glabrous herbs, subshrubs, or shrubs with heath-like habit. Leschenaultia leaves are usually linear, entire, and sessile; flowers are solitary and terminal or several in terminal, leafy corymbs.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 447]    447Leucocoryne:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Leucocoryne.
(1) Note. The genus Leucocoryne is a part of the Liliaceae (Alliaceae) family and includes about 12 species of herbaceous perennials which grow to 50 X 10 cm, many with the characteristic smell of garlic; bulbs to 2 cm wide, with dark brown tunics; 2-5 leaves to 35cm to 5 mm, basal, linear often channeled, senescent before flowering; 2-12 flowers, funnel-shaped, in umbels with 2 spathes; 6 perianth segments, similar, white, blue or violet, lower parts fused to basal tube, upper parts free, spreading. Leucocoryne plants are grown for their loose heads of scented, soft blue flowers carried over long periods in spring and early summer, Leucocorynespp. start growing early in the year; the grass-like foliage dies down at or slightly before flowering, and bulbs enter dormancy during summer and autumn. Leucocoryne plants are suitable for outdoor cultivation only in areas that are essentially frost-free, and they require a position in the full sun and in well-drained soil.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 448]    448Ligularia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Ligularia.
(1) Note. The genus Ligularia is a part of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Leopard Plant or as "a little tongue" referring to the tongue-shaped ray florets. Ligularia plants include about 180 species of perennial herbs with radical, broad, ovate-oblong to reniform, usually cordate basal leaves and long, broadly sheathed stems. Ligulariaplants are grown for their flowers and foliage and are grown as specimens by lakes and stream sides or in massed plantings in the dappled shade of woodland gardens. These plants demand deep, moist, fertile and humus-rich soils and benefit from a mulch of organic matter; on bright windy days, they may wilt very quickly, even where soil moisture may appear adequate.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 449]    449Limonium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Limonium.
(1) Note. The genus Limonium is a part of the Plumbaginaceae family and may also be referred to as Sea Lavender, Marsh Rosemary, or Statice. Limonium plants include about 150 species of perennial herbs or shrubs, or rarely annuals with inflorescences in a corymbose panicle of terminal spikelets on a scaly, bracteate stem; spikelets subtended by 3 floral bracts. The flowers of most species of Limoniumcan be air-dried for winter decorations; they range in form and color from the most subtle and delicate sprays on fine sinuous stems to the more extravagant and densely flowered panicles, frequently seen as florist s flowers and particularly valued for the strong bright colors they retain when dried, provided the flowers are kept away from the bright light.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 450]    450Liriope:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Liriope.
(1) Note. The genus Liriope is part of the Liliaceae (Convallariaceae) family and may also be referred to as Lily Turf. Liriope plants include some 5 species of perennial, evergreen, stemless, tufted, or occasionally rhizomatous herbs, which grow to 45 cm. with grass-like leaves; flowers white to dark mauve, grape-like, clustered in a scapose, elongated spike or raceme; tepals 6, free. The most frequently seen species in cultivation, L.muscari is valued as a fairly drought-tolerant evergreen groundcover bearing its densely flowered spikes of lavender blue in late autumn.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 451]    451Lobelia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Lobelia.
(1) Note. The genus Lobelia is a part of the Campanulaceae family and includes some 365 species of annual or perennial herbs, shrubs, and treelets, often with a milky, acrid sap. Lobelia flowers are in racemes or are solitary, sometimes with bracteolate and a bilabiate corolla, slit to the base on the upper side, with the lower 3 lobes large and spreading and the upper 2 lobes small and recurved. They are valued for their (typically) rich, deep blue flowers, though modern selections have extended the color range to include pure white, carmine pink, and pale lilacs.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 452]    452Lychnis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Lychnis.
(1) Note. The genus Lychnis is part of the Caryophyllaceae family and may also be referred to as Catchfly. Lychnis plants include about 20 species of mostly perennial herbs, differing from Silene only in the combination of 5 styles and a capsule opening with 5 teeth (most Silene species have 3 styles and a capsule opening with 6 teeth). Lychnisspp. range through northern temperature regions in diverse habitats, from fenland, damp meadows and moist woodlands, to rocky or alpine meadow habitats.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 453]    453Lysimachia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Lysimachia.
(1) Note. The genus Lysimachia is a part of the Primulaceae family and may also be referred to as Loosestrife. Lysimachiaplants include about 150 species of erect or procumbent herbs, rarely dwarf shrubs. Lysimachiaplants are a cosmopolitan genus, found in damp grassland or swampy terrain and are easily grown in moist borders in sun and part shade or at the waterside and in bog gardens. Lysimachia plants that are commonly cultivated are perennials and are inclined to be invasive.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 454]    454Mimulus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Mimulus.
(1) Note. The genus Mimulus is part of the Scrophulariaceae family and may also be referred to as Monkey Flower or Musk. Its Latin name mimus, a mimic actor,refers to a fanciful resemblence of the markings of the corolla to a grinning face; or from mimo, referring to gaping mouth of corolla. Mimulus plants include about 150 species of annual or perennial herbs, of erect or diffuse habit, or rarely shrubs. The flowers of Mimulus are axillary or on spike-like racemes.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 455]    455Monarda:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Monarda.
(1) Note. The genus Monarda is part of the Labiatae family and may also be referred to as Wild Bergamot, Horsemint, or Beebalm and includes about 16 species of aromatic annual or perennial herbs. Monarda flowers are borne in dense glomerules, terminal and solitary or in an interrupted spike, subtended by an involucre or usually foliar bracts. M. didyma has long been cultivated for oil of bergamot extracted from young leaves, for dried leaves in potpourri, and for the high nectar yield useful for bees. The annual species are usually grown for their sweet scent and for nectar production for bees. The perennial species, particularly the many showy forms of M. didyma, make first-rate clump-forming plants for the herbaceous border.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 456]    456Myosotis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Myosotis.
(1) Note. The genus Myosotis is part of the Boraginaceae family and may also be referred to as Forget-me-not or Scorpion grass and includes some 50 species of annual, biennial, or perennial pubescent herbs. Myosotis leaves are alternate; flowers usually in paired cymes, mostly white, blue, or purple usually with a conspicuous white or yellow eye; bracts usually absent; 5-lobed calyx, often accrescent in fruit; corolla rotate or salverform, 5 lobes, obtuse, spreading, faucal scales 5, distinct, usually included, papillose. M. sylvatica and M. alpestris occur in damp woodlands and meadows, the latter on basic rock formations. Their many cultivars are grown as hardy annuals or biennials (tolerating winter temperatures of at least – 15 C/ 5 F). Traditionally used in spring bedding and as border edging, they are also suited to window boxes and to pot cultivation in the cold glasshouse for winter and early spring blooms.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 457]    457Narcissus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Narcissus.
(1) Note. The genus Narcissus is part of the Amaryllidaceae family, may also be referred to as Daffodil, and includes about 50 species of perennial bulbous herbs. Its flowers are yellow or white, sometimes fragrant, erect to drooping, solitary or in an umbel of 2-20, subtended by a one-valved, usually scarious membranous spathe, borne on a leafless scape; perianth tubular at the base, with 6 segments, almost always with a conspicuous corona in the form of a trumpet or a smaller ring or cup, often a different color from the segments. Narcissi (which include all daffodils) are among the most popular garden plants, can be grown in beds and borders, rock gardens, in grass and woodlands, and in pots. They are also excellent as cut flowers. Their flowering period extends from late autumn to early summer though the main flowering period is in spring.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 458]    458Nemesia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Nemesia.
(1) Note. The genus Nemesia is part of the Scrophulariaceae family and includes some 65 species of annual or perennial herbs or subshrubs. Nemesia flowers are axillary or in short terminal racemes; bilabiate corolla with very short tube, produced into spur or pouch at front, upper lip 4-lobed, lower entire or bilabiate, with palate almost closing throat. Nemesia plants are commonly used as frost-tender annuals for summer bedding, mixed borders, and pot-plant display in cool glasshouses.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 459]    459Nierembergia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Nierembergia.
(1) Note. The genus Nierembergia is a part of the Solanaceae family and may also be referred to as Cupflower and includes some 23 species of annual or perennial herbs or subshrubs. Nierembergia flowers are solitary, terminal, or in cymes; calyx is tubular to campanulate, 5-lobed, with lobes spreading; corolla is tubular, limb spreading and 5-lobed. Nierembergiaspp. are slender-stemmed, graceful plants, generally found growing wild in moist but sunny situations in the temperate regions of South America. The upturned, bell-like, salverform flowers last from summer until well into the autumn and, in creeping species, nestle against a backdrop of spreading, dark green foliage.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 460]    460Oenothera:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Oenothera.
(1) Note. The genus Oenothera is part of the Onagraceae family and may also be referred to as Sundrops or Suncups or Evening Primrose and includes 124 species of annual, biennial, or perennial herbs. Oenotheraplants have erect, ascending stems that are rarely decumbent and sometimes rooting at nodes, with taproot or fibrous roots, rarely rhizomatous; leaves sometimes in basal rosette, otherwise alternate, sessile or petiolate, entire and dentate or pinnatifid; stipules absent; flowers usually large and showy, solitary in leaf axils or gathered into corymbose, racemose or spicate inflorescences, actinomorphic, 4-merous, opening at dawn or dusk, soon fading; floral tube cylindrical, apex flared, deciduous; petals white, yellow, or purple, rarely red or with a red spot, becoming orange and purple, obovate or obcordate. Cultivated ornamentals include the evening primroses, which are generally evening-flowering, and the sundrops or suncups, which are day-flowering. Some of the evening primroses are day-flowering, but some bear fragile and often scented blooms at night, which wither and die in the morning sun. Cultivated types are generally tap-rooted plants of stony and well-drained soils or mountainous country, preferring a dryish, sunny site in the garden.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 461]    461Omphalodes:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Omphalodes.
(1) Note. The genus Omphalodes is a part of the Boraginaceae family and may also be referred to as Navelwort or Navelseed and includes some 28 species of annual, biennial, or perennial herbs, glabrous or minutely pubescent. Omphalodes flowers are usually in terminal cymes, sometimes solitary and axillary, white or blue, sometimes bracteate; calyx 5-parted, accrescent in fruit; corolla 5-lobed, subrotate or subcampanulate, tube short, throat with 5 saccate invaginations forming an eye, frequently paler than the rest of the corolla. Most Omphalodes species are suitable for cool positions in the rock garden or for naturalizing in light, open woodland with treatment.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 462]    462Ornithogalum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Ornithogalum.
(1) Note. The genus Ornithogalum is a part of the Lilaceae family and includes some 80 species of bulbous perennial herbs. Ornithogalum inflorescence is a scapose raceme or corymb, pyramidal, to subcylindric, 2- to many flowered; bracts usually conspicuous; tepals 6, equal or unequal in 2 distinct whorls, white, rarely yellow, orange or red, outside usually marked with a green stripe, usually widely spreading, rarely erect. Ornithogalum leaves are in a rosette, linear to lanceolate or obovate, sometimes with a silver-white median stripe above and margins smooth or hairy. Ornithogalumhas two main centers of distribution, in South Africa and around the Mediterranean, but includes a number of more northerly European natives which are robust and cold-hardy in cultivation, some of which may become invasive where conditions suit.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 463]    463Oxalis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Oxalis.
(1) Note. The genus Oxalis is a part of the Oxalidaceae family and may also be referred to as Sorrel or Shamrock and includes about 800 species of annual or perennial, stemmed or stemless herbs and shrubs, often with tuberous or bulbous underground parts; very rarely aquatic plants; leaves radical or cauline, palmate; leaflets usually 3, sometimes more or phyllodic, often folding down at night; stipules adnate to petiole bases or absent; flowers with a tristylic, heteromorphic arrangement of parts on axillary peduncles; often in cymes or contractions of this to umbellate, 1- to many-flowered; bracteoles in pairs subtending pedicels and cyme branches, many and crowded in umbellate inflorescences; pedicels articulate below calyx and/or their base; petals usually partly fused at base, white, pink, red, or yellow. Although a number of species are potential weeds that spread by means of seed and underground bulbils and may prove difficult to eradicate, Oxalisincludes a number of beautiful ornamentals for a diversity of situations in the garden. Most species are low and spreading; the flowers and sometimes the leaves close up at night or in shade.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 464]    464Papaver:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Papaver.
(1) Note. The genus Papaver is a part of the Papaveraceae family and may also be referred to as Poppy and includes some 50 species of annual or perennial, glaucous, rarely glabrous, herbs which grow to 120 cm. Papaverleaves are basal or cauline, pinnatifid to pinnatisect, toothed, serrate or, rarely, crenate, occasionally bristly, segments often pinnate or bipinnate, irregularly incised. Papaverflowers are solitary with 2, rarely 3 sepals, concave, overlapping, short-lived; 4 petals, rarely 5 or 6, usually obovate, obtuse, creased in bud and often withering and falling early. Poppies are easily grown in the mixed border, herbaceous border, and in rock gardens.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 465]    465Penstemon:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Penstemon.
(1) Note. The genus Penstemon is a part of the Scrophulariaceae family and includes some 250 species of subshrubs or perennial herbs, some grown as annuals. Penstemon inflorescences are a racemose, cymose, or a thyrsoid showy panicle; calyx is 5-lobed, corolla tubular, almost regular to strongly bilabiate, upper lip 2-lobed, lower 3 cleft. The warm colors of Penstemonspp. and cultivars make a valuable contribution to the late summer and autumn flower garden. Diversity of natural habitat gives a variety of tolerance to differing garden sites. The majority of commonly cultivated species are found in dryish, sunny sites or in sub-alpine woodlands, meadows, and plains on light, often impoverished soils.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 466]    466Pentas:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Pentas.
(1) Note. The genus Pentas is a part of the Rubiaceae family and includes some 30 or 40 species of perennial, or rarely biennial, herbs or shrubs. Pentas flowers are bisexual, 1-3 morphous, crowded in terminal, much-branched cymes or flat-topped corymbs; corolla is tubular to cylindric, tube often funnel-shaped and swollen above and pubescent at throat, lobes 5, unequal, valvate in bud, ovate to oblong. Pentas plants are woody-based herbs or shrubs with cymes or domed cymes of crowded flowers in a range of shades of red, pink, or mauve and are grown in the glasshouse or for summer use outdoors in tubs and bedding schemes.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 467]    467Persicaria:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Persicaria.
(1) Note. The genus Persicaria, also Polygonum,is part of the Polygonaceae family and may also be referred to as Knotweed, Smartweed, Fleece Vine, or Silver Lace Vine. Persicaria includes some 150 species of mostly annual or perennial herbs, occasionally aquatic or scramblers, woody subshrubs, with stems appearing jointed. Persicaria flowers are small, sometimes showy, fertile, clustered in axils of leaves or bracts, or in terminal panicles or spikes; perianth funnel- or bell-shaped, segments 3-6, commonly 5, usually equal, petal-like, white, pink, or red. A diverse genus with species suited to a number of situations in the garden. Although most have invasive potential which must be taken account of when sitting, this tendency can often be used to advantage in larger landscape plantings.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 468]    468Phygelius:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Phygelius.
(1) Note. The genus Phygelius is part of the Scrophulariaceae family and includes a genus of 2 species and many hybrids; evergreens or semi-evergreen shrubs and subshrubs which grow to 1-1.5m. Phygelius plants have woody stems at their base, soft above; shoots erect, glabrous, angular. Inflorescences are often one-sided; flowers pendulous; corolla tubular, pink to orange-red, narrowing towards base, 5-lobed, margins sharply recurved. Spring growth is rapid and plants will give useful front to mid-border height, proving remarkably drought-tolerant and freely producing their warmly colored panicles of fuchsia-like flowers from summer until late in the season.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 469]    469Plectranthus:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Plectranthus.
(1) Note. The genus Plectranthus is part of the Labiatae family and includes some 350 species of annuals, perennial herbs, or shrubs. Plectranthusplants have herbaceous, semi-succulent, or succulent stems and leaves; paniculate, racemose, or spicate inflorescence, usually terminal, flowers in verticils, occasionally solitary more often cymes; corolla tube variously gibbous, bilabiate, upper lip usually 4-lobed, lower longer than upper. This large genus provides many attractive ornamental flowering plants for conservatory or bedding outside in summer.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 470]    470Polemonium:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Polemonium.
(1) Note. The genus Polemonium is part of the Polemoniaceae family and may also be referred to as Jacob s Ladder or Sky Pilot. Polemonium includes some 25 species of erect, decumbent, or spreading annuals or more commonly rhizomatous and caespitous perennials that are often foul-smelling. Leaves are usually alternate, pinnate, compound or very deeply pinnatifid, leaflets entire or divided; inflorescence a lax or dense, axillary or terminal cyme; flowers sometimes solitary; corolla narrowly funnel-form to rotate-campanulate, usually blue or white, rarely purple, yellow or pink, lobes rounded to spathulate. P. caeruleum is native to damp grassland and rocky habitats, frequently on limestone soils.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 471]    471Portulaca:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Portulaca.
(1) Note. The genus Portulaca is part of the Portulacaceae family and may also be referred to as Purslane or Moss Rose. Portulaca includes some 40 species of fleshy or trailing mostly annual herbs. Leaves are alternate or nearly opposite, flat or sometimes cylindrical, often with tufts of bristles in the axils, the upper forming a leafy involucre subtending the often showy and variously colored flowers. Flowers are purple, yellow, or pink with 4-6 petals which open in direct sunshine and close in shadow. P. grandiflora is grown for its fleshy, moss-like foliage and for the profusion of individually short-lived, brightly colored flowers carried over long periods in summer. Portulaca plants are ideally suited as low-growing, seasonal filler in flower beds and borders, as edging, for window boxes and other containers and are easily grown from seed sown in situ in spring, in any low-nutrient, freely draining, sandy soil in full sun.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 472]    472Primula:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Primula.
(1) Note. The genus Primula is part of the Primulaceae family and includes some 400 species of perennial, mostly alpine herbs with short rhizomes and leaves in basal rosettes, radical, simple, entire, toothed or lobes; many species with farina, a wax secreted from glands on surfaces of the leaves. Primula plants have peduncles that are often conspicuous, sometimes reduced and hidden in rosettes, the flower stalk being an elongated pedicel; inflorescences terminal, verticillate or umbellate with involucral bracts, or a simple raceme, green parts often farinose; flowers 5-merous, often fragrant, and corolla tube usually exceeding calyx. The genus Primula is one of the largest and most important plants in cultivation in temperate gardens, ranging from the most amenable and undemanding of plants to those which present an irresistible challenge to the most skilled of growers.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 473]    473Pulmonaria:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Pulmonaria.
(1) Note. The genus Pulmonaria is part of the Boraginaceae family and may also be referred to as Lungwort. Pulmonaria plants include some 14 species of perennial, pubescent herbs with creeping rhizomes, simple stems, leaves that are simple, green, sometimes spotted white, inflorescence of terminal, forked cymes, bracteate; flowers white, pink, blue, or purple; corolla 5-lobed, infundibular, throat with 5 tufts of hairs. Pulmonariaspp. occur in shaded sites on deep soils rich in organic matter; P. officinalis is generally found over limestone.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 474]    474Rudbeckia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Rudbeckia.
(1) Note. The genus Rudbeckia is part of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Coneflower. Rudbeckia plants include some 15 species of usually perennial, rarely annual or biennial, herbs with simple or branched stems and alternate, entire to 2-pinnatifid leaves; few capitula that are usually solitary, radiate; phyllaries in few to many series; receptacle naked or scaly, hemispheric to conic; ray florets sterile, mostly yellow or orange; disc florets tubular, hermaphrodite. Rudbeckiaplantsare grown for their large, usually yellow daisies with the prominent central cone and often reflexed ray florets which give a characteristic shuttlecock outline to the flower; Rudbeckia plants include many useful species used for cutting and as summer borders; Rudbeckia performs particularly well during long hot late summers. The species are particularly useful for native plant collections and for naturalizing; the many cultivars, even where truly perennial, will flower in their first year from early sowings and are often treated as annuals. Rudbeckia plants grow in any moderately fertile and retentive garden soil in sun or part day shade.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 475]    475Salvia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Salvia.
(1) Note. The genus Salvia is part of the Labiatae family and may also be referred to as Sage. Salvia plants include some 900 or more species of perennial or, occasionally, annual or biennial herbs, shrubs or subshrubs with erect or ascending, glabrous to glandular and/or variously pubescent stems; leaves sessile or petiolate, simple, or lyrate or pinnatisect; flowers in 2-40 flowered, approximate or distant verticillasters, these disposed in terminal or axillary racemes, spikes, panicles, or rarely, cymes; corolla 2-lipped, upper lip hooded, erect, plane or falcate, entire to emarginated or bifid, lower lip spreading, 3-lobed, lateral lobes reduced, middle lobe often emarginated. Of the 900 or so species of Salvia plants, a large percentage are among the most ornamental flowering plants, providing a long-lasting display as shrubs, herbaceous perennials, biennials, and annuals. Several species have deliciously aromatic foliage, and some are used in widespread cultivation for medicinal uses and as culinary herbs.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 476]    476Sanvitalia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Sanvitalia.
(1) Note. The genus Sanvitalia is part of the Compositae family and includes about 7 species of annual to perennial herbs with opposite, simple, entire leaves; radiate capitula; receptacle hemispheric to narrowly conic, scaly; phyllaries in 2-3 series, imbricate, dry or partly herbaceous; ray florets female, fertile, persistent on fruit, white or yellow; disc florets purple or white with a green tinge. The Sanvitalia plantis an undemanding, creeping annual for border edges, windowboxes, and hanging baskets. Sanvitalia plants grow in sun in an open position in well-drained, moderately fertile soil.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 477]    477Sarracenia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Sarracenia.
(1) Note. The genus Sarracenia is part of the Sarraceniaceae family and may also be referred to as Pitcher Plant. Sarracenia plants include some 8 species of carnivorous herbaceous perennials with horizontal, stout rhizomes with apical cluster of leaves; leaves of annual duration, usually pitcher-form, but sometimes not forming pitchers, especially over winter; pitchers 15-100 cm, erect to decumbent, elongate ("trumpet-shaped") or squat, with broad lateral wing and terminal lid or laminal flap, apex sometimes hooded and inflated, with entrance to pitcher somewhat concealed, but usually lamina erect, not covering mouth of pitcher, mouth often with distinct thickened margin, pitchers usually green or yellow-green, often variously marked red or brown especially on veins, sometimes with many translucent white spots toward apex; coloring often variable, sometimes related to light intensity; inflorescences usually much exceeding pitchers; scape unbranched, naked, glaucous; flower pendulous, opening before young pitchers mature in spring, thereby preventing undesirable capture of pollinating insects; 5 petals, ovate to oblong, large, yellow to red.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 478]    478Scabiousa or Scabiosa:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Scabiousa or Scabiosa.
(1) Note. The genus Scabiousa or Scabiosais part of the Dipsacaceae family and may also be referred to as Pincushion Flower or Scabious. Scabiosa plants include some 60-80 species of annual or perennial herbs, or rarely subshrubs; leaves opposite, entire to toothed, lobed or much divided, often in basal rosettes; flowers blue, rose, purple, yellow-white or white in long-stalked, hemispherical, terminal heads subtended by 1-2 series of involucral bracts; calyx cupular, bristly; corolla with 5 unequal lobes and a short tube, lobes often 2-lipped. Scabiosaspp. are used in diverse situations in the garden; for example, in annual and cut flower borders valued for the translucent spherical seedheads used in dried arrangements, in the wild garden, and in dry sunny meadows, in approximation of habitat, where they form a valuable nectar source for bees and butterflies and a food source for caterpillars; in the rock garden; in the herbaceous border; and for cutting. Scabiosa plants may be selected for their color from pure creamy white through soft lavender to strong blues and the soft pale yellows.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 479]    479Sedum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Sedum.
(1) Note. The genus Sedum is part of the Crassulaceae family and includes over 300 species of usually succulent, annual to perennial herbs and subshrubs; stems erect or decumbent, sometimes tufted or creeping; leaves fleshy, compressed to round in cross section, alternate, opposite or sometimes whorled, entire or nearly so; inflorescence usually terminal, often a compound cyme; flowers usually hermaphrodite, floral parts in fives, occasionally 3-, 4-, 6-, or 7-merous, white or yellow, more rarely red or purple, very rarely blue; petals usually 5. The Sedum plant is the largest genus in the Crassulaceae family and is found in a wide range of habitats including marshlands, deserts, and alpine regions, with some forest epiphytes. Many are suitable in scale for the rock garden and are commonly grown outside or in the alpine house, although care must be taken in selection and sitting since some species can be invasive or will spread indefinitely, swamping out less vigorous neighbors.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 480]    480Senecio:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Senecio.
(1) Note. The genus Senecio is part of the Compositae family and includes about 1000 species of trees, shrubs, lianes, and herbs with alternate leaves, entire to variously lobed; capitula usually in corymbs, rarely solitary, usually radiate; receptacle flat, naked; phyllaries mostly uniseriate, sometimes with shorter subsidiary phyllaries at base of capitulum (calyculus); ray florets usually female; disc florets hermaphrodite, yellow, rarely white or purple. Senecio is an enormous and extraordinarily diverse genus in terms of cultivation requirements, with a huge number of species that are scarcely ornamental and many that prove noxious and invasive weeds in habitat. The hardy ornamental species include the group of low growing alpine natives suited in scale to the rock garden, most of which are pioneering species of poor, dry gravelly soils.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 481]    481Silene:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Silene.
(1) Note. The genus Silene is part of the Caryophyllaceae family and may also be referred to as Campion or Catchfly. Silene includes about 500 species of annual, biennial, or perennial herbs, often woody at the base and sometimes suffruticose; inflorescence very varied, often few flowered, or flowers solitary; flowers usually hermaphrodite; but in some species, unisexual flowers occur and a few species are strictly dioecious; calyx more or less tubular with (5)10-30(60) veins and 5 teeth, sometimes strongly inflated; petals with entire, notched, or bifid (rarely 4-fid) limb and narrow claw, with or without coronal scales. Silenespp. are diverse, beautiful, and with few exceptions, a cold-hardy genus and can be used in a number of situations in the garden, such as in the rock garden and in the alpine house.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 482]    482Sinningia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Sinningia.
(1) Note. The genus Sinningia is part of the Gesneriaceae family and includes some 40 species of perennial, tuberous herbs and shrubs, rarely rhizomatous; leaves opposite or in whorls, and often crowded at the base of the stem; flowers solitary or clustered in leaf axils, occasionally scented; campanulate to cylindric corolla; limb broad, spreading, 2-lipped, lower lip 3-lobed, upper lip 2-lobed, lips often indistinct. Sinningiaspp. usually occur in tropical zones with seasonal rainfall, and die back to the tuber in dry periods. They are grown for their large velvet-textured flowers; they require intermediate to warm glasshouse protection and may be successfully moved to the home or cooler glasshouse when in flower.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 483]    483Solidago:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Solidago.
(1) Note. The genus Solidago is part of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Goldenrod. Solidago plants include about 100 species of perennial herbs with short rootstock or rhizome; stems simple at the base and branching below panicles; leaves alternate, often dentate or in rosettes; capitula small, radiate, usually many, in fascicles, thyrses, or scorpioid or corymbose panicles; involucre more or less cylindric; phyllaries imbricate in many rows; ray florets few to several, female and yellow; tubular disc florets, hermaphrodite, and yellow. Solidago plants are suitable for larger herbaceous borders; the hybrids and cultivars are greatly valued for their tolerance of a range of conditions in cultivation and for their late summer color, a number making excellent cut flowers. The species occur in a range of habitats, and most are more suitable for the wild garden and other naturalistic plantings in conditions that approximate the conditions of those in habitat.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 484]    484Stokesia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Stokesia.
(1) Note. The genus Stokesia is part of the Compositae family and may also be referred to as Stokes Aster. Stokesia plants include 1 species of erect perennial herbs which grow to 1 m. with alternate, elliptic to oblong-lanceolate leaves, margins entire or spinose toward the base; capitula radiate to 10 cm in diameter, solitary and terminal or few to many in a corymb; phyllaries in many series, oblong to lanceolate; receptacle flat, naked; florets white, yellow to pale lavender to deep indigo; ray florets spreading, 5-lobed. Stokesia plants are grown for cutting and at the front of the herbaceous border for their pretty, fringed, cornflower-like blooms carried over long periods, usually from summer into autumn, although in climates approximate to the climates of those in habitat Stokesia may bloom throughout the year. The foliage makes an evergreen and winter-persistent basal rosette above a fleshy rootstock which is prone to rot in moist and heavy soils in winter.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 485]    485Sutera:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Sutera.
(1) Note. The genus Sutera is part of the Scrophulariaceae family and may also be referred to as Jamesbrittenia or Jamesbrittenia grandiflora. Sutera plants include about 130 species of annual or perennial herbs, subshrubs, and small shrubs with leaves usually opposite, sometimes clustered, entire, toothed, or lobed; inflorescence an axillary or terminal raceme, spike, or cyme; corolla not spurred, tube long or short, straight or curved upwards at apex, with 5 lobes, subequal or forming 2 lips. A charming compact perennial suitable for bedding schemes in cool regions or for permanent edging where temperatures do not fall below 5 C/40 F.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 486]    486Tiarella:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Tiarella.
(1) Note. The genus Tiarella is part of the Saxifragaceae family and may also be referred to as False Mitrewort or Sugar Scoop. Tiarella plants include about 5 species of rhizomatous perennial herbs, which grow to 50 cm with basal, orbicular, cordate, trifoliolate, dentate, or palmate leaves and long petioles; racemose scapose, simple or branched, and usually terminal; flowers small, white or red; sepals 5, fused at the base to form a campanulate cup, lobes triangular; 5 petals, clawed, elliptic to lanceolate or filiform. Tiarellaplants are frost hardy in most northern temperate zones, although they will suffer from prolonged winter wetness. They often provide autumn color and have fine foliage worthy of the treatment accorded choicer specimens which thrive on shady beds. Remove decayed leaves in winter and protect the rhizomes with a mulch of garden compost. Tiarella plants require shade and a moist, humus-rich soil.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 487]    487Torenia:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Torenia.
(1) Note. The genus Torenia is part of the Scrophulariaceae family and includes some 40 species of perennial or annual herbs, glabrous to hirsute, branched, somewhat decumbent; opposite, entire, crenate leaves; inflorescence a short terminal or axillary raceme, short, few-flowered; calyx tubular, plicate or 3-5-ribbed and – winged; corolla 2-lipped, tube cylindrical or dilated above, upper lip erect, concave, 2-cleft sometimes obscurely so, lower lip patent, 3-lobed. Toreniaplants are suited best for moist soil, in part shade.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 488]    488Tricyrtis:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Tricyrtis.
(1) Note. The genus Tricyrtis is part of the Liliaceae family and may also be referred to as Toad Lily. Tricyrtis plants include 10-16 species of perennial herbs with short, creeping rhizomes; stems 20-110 cm, leafy, erect or arched, simple below or with few branches; leaves are ovate to lanceolate, alternate, sometimes amplexicaul or subsessile, somewhat plicate, occasionally with dark green spots; inflorescence terminal or in upper leaf axils, erect, solitary, or cymose, loosely dichotomous; flowers white or yellow with purple spots, bisexual, few, campanulate, with fairly long pedicels; tepals, style and filaments usually spotted violet to red-purple. Tricyrtis plants are handsome perennials of elegant and graceful habit, with upright arching stems clothed with attractive stem-clasping leaves. sometimes, also, with conspicuous velvety down. They are grown for their subtly colored flowers, of substantial waxen texture and curious form, beautifully spotted and freckled with contrasting shades of rich chocolate, purple, and maroon.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 489]    489Verbascum:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Verbascum.
(1) Note. The genus Verbascum is part of the Scrophulariaceae family and includes some 250-300 species of mostly biennial herbs, sometimes annual, perennial, or subshrubs with alternate leaves, usually in a rosette, simple, entire, or crenately or sinuately lobed, sometimes pinnatifid, often soft, sometimes densely woolly; inflorescence often pachycaul, a spike, a panicle or a raceme; flowers yellow, tawny, red, red-brown, purple, blue, or sometimes white; calyx deeply 5-parted; corolla rotate; tube short, 5 lobes, subequal. The erect resinous stems, dipped in tallow, were once used as candles; the entire candelabra inflorescence has been used as a professional torch. The Romans used Verbascumcosmetically as a hair dye, and its wooly foliage was used by European peasants as a warm lining for footwear. The seed when fed to fish was soporific and rendered them more easily poached.
  
[List of Patents for class PLT subclass 490]    490Zantedeschia or Calla Lily:
 This subclass is indented under subclass 263.1.  Plant which belongs to the genus Zantedeschia.
(1) Note. The genus Zantedeschia is part of the Araceae family and may also be referred to as Arum Lily or Calla Lily. Zantedeschia plants include 6 species of rhizomatous perennial herbs which grow to 2.5m; rhizomes subterranean, fleshy, oblique, much branched; leaves to 45 cm+, borne from apex of rhizome, deciduous or evergreen, lanceolate to orbicular, base cuneate or truncate, or hastate, sagittate to cordate, apex acute or obtuse with subulate tip, usually dark green, spotted, or unspotted, margin undulate, main lateral veins united with marginal vein, minor veins reticular; petioles spongy, long, often exceeding length of lamina, sheathed at base, peduncle long, often much exceeding foliage; spathe subcylindric to funnel-shaped, convolute at base, apex often recurved, to 25 cm, ivory-white, cream, yellow, to pink or rosy-purple, often with purple blotch at base within, persistent; spadix sessile to stipitate, much shorter than spathe, usually yellow, flowers unisexual, male and female zones adjacent, male much longer than female zone; perianth absent. In recent years, cultivars with spathes in rich tones of pink, ruby, mauve, green, and yellow have enjoyed popularity as pot plants and cut blooms.
  

FOREIGN ART COLLECTIONS

The definitions below correspond to abolished subclasses from which these collections were formed. See the Foreign Art Collection schedule of this Class for specific correspondences. [Note: The titles and definitions for indented art collections include all the details of the one(s) that are hierarchically superior.]

FOR 100HERBACEOUS ORNAMENTAL FLOWERING PLANT (E.G., NICOTINIA, TRITOMA, DELPHINIUM, DICENTRA, LOBELIA, NASTURTIUM, ETC.) (PLT/263):
 This Foreign Art Collection is indented under the class definition. Foreign Art Collection including a plant which is herbaceous and principally characterized by and grown for its attractive blossoms (e.g., nicotinia, tritoma, delphinium, dicentra, lobelia, nasturtium, etc.).
(1) Note. Annuals, biennials, perennials and flowering "house plants" are proper for this subclass if not provided for specifically elsewhere.
  
FOR 101New Guinea (PLT/318):
 This Foreign Art Collection is indented under unnumbered placeholder PLT/FOR 317. Foreign Art Collection including impatiens which belongs to the species I. hawkeri.
  
FOR 102Petunia (PLT/356):
 This Foreign Art Collection is indented under PLT/FOR 100. Foreign Art Collection including a plant which belongs to the genus Petunia.
(1) Note. Petunias are characterized as being annual or perennial plants having pubescent stems, solitary flowers in upper leaf axils; having five-lobed calyx and five-lobed salviform to funnelform usually equally lobed, complete, ruffled or crimped corolla of solid, mixed, and varied color patterns.
  

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