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PRODUCTION OF SUCROSE; APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED THEREFOR (chemically synthesised sugars or sugar derivatives C07H ; fermentation or enzyme-using processes for preparing compounds containing saccharide radicals C12P 19/00)
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Reducing the size of material from which sugars are to be extracted; Presses and knives therefor,

Production and purification of sugar juices, e.g. juices derived from beet, cane or maple,

Expressing water from material from which sugars have been extracted,

Evaporators or boiling pans specially adapted for sugar juices; Evaporating, or boiling sugar juices,

Crystallisation; Crystallising apparatus; Separating crystals from mother liquors,

Extraction of sucrose from molasses; Extraction apparatus,

Drying sugar,

Cutting machines, combined cutting, sorting, and packing machines specially adapted for sugar, or

Sugar products, i.e. physical forms of sugar, such as powdered, lump or liquid sugar; Working-up of sugar

Relationship between large subject matter areas

Chemically synthesised sugars or sugar derivatives are classified in C07H

Naturally-occuring saccharides, other than sucrose, are classified in C13K

Preparation of cellulose derivatives are classified in C08B 1/00-C08B 17/00.

Fermentation or enzyme-using processes for preparing compounds containing saccharide radicals C12P 19/00

Food or foodstuff containing carbohydrate syrups; containing sugars; containing sugar alcohols, e.g. xylitol; containing starch hydrolysates, e.g. dextrin A23L 1/09, artificial sweetening agent A23L 1/236

References relevant to classification in this group
This subclass/group does not cover:
Harvesting of sugar beets
Harvesting of sugar-cane
Tapping of tree-juices
Tapping-spouts, Receptacles for juices
Sweetmeats, Confectionery
Foods containing carbohydrate syrups, sugars, sugar alcohols or starch hydrolysates
Extraction of starch
Pressing water from starch-extracted material
Fermentation or enzyme-using processes for preparing compounds containing saccharide radicals
Informative references
Attention is drawn to the following places, which may be of interest for search:
Boiling apparatus
Separation
Crushing, pulverizing, or disintegrating in general
Centrifuges
Hand-held cutting tools not otherwise provided for
Cutting in general
Presses in general
Storing in general
Obtaining or extracting cellulose for the purpose of making paper
Drying in general
Glossary of terms
In this subclass/group, the following terms (or expressions) are used with the meaning indicated:
Aldose
An aldose is a monosaccharide (a simple sugar) containing one aldehyde group per molecule and having a chemical formula of the form Cn(H2O)n (n>= 3). With only 3 carbon atoms, glyceraldehyde is the simplest of all aldoses.Aldoses isomerise to ketoses in the Lobry-de Bruyn-van Ekenstein transformation. Aldose differs from ketose in that it has a carbonyl group at the end of the carbon chain whereas the carbonyl group of a ketose is in the middle; this fact allows them to be chemically differentiated through Seliwanoff's test.
Disaccharide
A disaccharide is a sugar (a carbohydrate) composed of two monosaccharides.‘Disaccharide’ is one of the four chemical groupings of carbohydrates (monosaccharide, disaccharide, oligosaccharide and polysaccharide).
Hexose
A hexose is a monosaccharide with six carbon atoms having the chemical formula C6H12O6.
Ketose
A ketose is a sugar containing one ketone group per molecule.With 3 carbon atoms, dihydroxyacetone is the simplest of all ketoses and is the only one having no optical activity. Ketoses can isomerise into an aldose when the carbonyl group is located at the end of the molecule. Such ketoses are reducing sugars.
Monosaccharide
Monosaccharides (from Greek monos: single, sacchar: sugar) are the most basic unit of carbohydrates. They consist of one sugar and are usually colorless, water-soluble, crystalline solids. Some monosaccharides have a sweet taste. Examples of monosaccharides include glucose (dextrose), fructose, galactose, xylose and ribose. Monosaccharides are the building blocks of disaccharides such as sucrose (common sugar) and polysaccharides (such as cellulose and starch).
Oligosaccharide
An oligosaccharide is a saccharide containing less than six monosaccharides. The name derived from the Greek oligos, meaning "a few".
Pentose
A pentose is a monosaccharide with five carbon atoms.
Polysaccharide
Polysaccharides are polymers containing more than five monosaccharides joined together by glycosidic bonds. They are therefore very large, often branched, macromolecules. They tend to be amorphous, insoluble in water and have no sweet taste. When all the monosaccharides in a polysaccharide are the same type, the polysaccharide is called a homopolysaccharide, but when more than one type of monosaccharide is present, they are called heteropolysaccharides.Examples include storage polysaccharides such as starch and glycogen and structural polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin.
Saccharose
Synonym for sucrose
Sucrose
Sucrose (common name: table sugar, also called saccharose) is a disaccharide of glucose and fructose, with the molecular formula C12H22O11. Its systematic name is α-D-glucopyranosyl- (1↔2)-β-D-fructofuranoside (ending in "oside", because it's not a reducing sugar).
Sugar
Sugar is a class of edible crystalline water-soluble carbohydrates that vary widely in sweetness and typically are optically active, including the mono-, di- and oligosaccharides (e. g. sucrose, lactose, and fructose). Sugar as a basic food carbohydrate primarily comes from sugar cane and from sugar beet, but also appears in fruit, honey, sorghum, sugar maple (in maple syrup), and in many other sources. It forms the main ingredient in much candy.In non-scientific use, the term sugar refers to sucrose (also called "table sugar" or "saccharose") — a white crystalline solid disaccharide. In this informal sense, the word "sugar" principally refers to crystalline sugars.
Synonyms and Keywords

In patent documents the following expressions/words "saccharose" and "sucrose" are often used as synonyms.

Reducing the size of material from which sugar is to be extracted (for extraction of starch C08B 30/02)
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Methods for reducing the size of material from which sugar is to be extracted and not disclosed in the subgroups

Mechanical means to minimize the length, width or thickness of the sugar stock other than the ones disclosed in the subgroups.

Cutting sugar cane
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

The cutting of sugar cane, whatever type of cutting, i.e. penetrating cane with an edged instrument.

Shredding sugar cane
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

The shredding of sugar cane, shredding producing long narrow strips or fragments.

Production of sugar juices (tapping of tree-juices A01G 23/10; tapping-spouts, receptacles for juices A01G 23/14)
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Production of sugar juices, sugar juices being solutions of sugar, comprising mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose which are derived from different plants, e.g. beet, cane

{ using chemicals other than extracting agents}
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Chemical agents can be for example preservative or antioxidants to avoid oxidation of some components in the sugar juices

Extracting agents being for example water

Relationship between large subject matter areas

a chemical compound that has also the function of preserving will be classified in C13B 10/003 and C13B13/006

{ Conservation of sugar juices}
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Any methods, agents used to preserve the sugar juices, e.g. use of preservative, pH, low temperature

Expressing juice from sugar cane or similar material, e.g. sorghum saccharatum
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Juice from sugar cane e.g. sorghum saccharum or from same plant family

combined with imbibition
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Production of sugars juices by expressing juice form sugar cane combined with imbibition, the imbibition being the displacement of one liquid with another liquid, e.g. by adding hot water

{ with transportation in the form of thin layers, e.g. by endless chains}
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Continuous processes of extracting sugar from sugar beet with water, with transportation in the form of thin layers, e.g. conveyor belt of 30 m long, 7 m wide and the layer of cossettes being 1 m (maximisation of surface area)

using extracting agents other than water, e.g. alcohol or salt solutions
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Production of sugar juices using extracting agents other than water, e.g. alcohol, aqueous salt solutions

Expressing water from material from which sugar has been extracted (from starch-extracted material C08B 30/10)
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Water being extracted from material from which the majority of the sugar has already been extracted, i.e. extraction of the remaining water out from the sugar cane or beet material which contains still some traces of sugar.

Purification of sugar juices
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Elimination of imperfections of solutions of mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose which are derived from different plants, e.g. beet, cane, etc.

followed by saturation
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Purification of sugar juices using alkaline earth metal compounds followed by saturation, e.g. addition of Ca (OH)2 that precipitates as calcium carbonate after addition of CO2, which absorbs impurities contained in the sugar juices. and the addition of this alkaline earth metal compound is done until saturation, saturation being the point at which a solution of a substance can dissolve no more of that substance

{ for fractionating, adsorption or ion exclusion processes combined with elution or desorption of a sugar fraction}
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Purification of sugar juices using ion-exchange materials for fractionating, adsorption or ion exclusion processes combined with elution or desorption of a sugar fraction. The desired sugar fraction is adsorbed in the ion exchange material itself and needs to be treated from the ion exchange material, e.g. by elution

{ using membranes, e.g. osmosis, ultrafiltration (electrodialysis C13B 20/18) }
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Purification of sugar juices by physical means using membranes, i.e. filter materials, e.g. nanofiltration, ultrafiltration

References relevant to classification in this group
This subclass/group does not cover:
Purification of sugar juices by electrical means, e.g. electrodialysis
Evaporators or boiling pans specially adapted for sugar juices; Evaporating or boiling sugar juices
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Processes and apparatus for evaporating, dissipating vapour or boiling solutions of sugar, comprising mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose which are derived from different plants, e.g. beet, canes

e.g. boiling pans specially adapted for sugar juices

Crystallisation; Crystallising apparatus; Separating crystals from mother liquors; { Evaporating or boiling sugar juice}
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Crystallisation of sugar, e.g by using chemicals, in continuous or discontinuous processes; crystallising apparatus for sugar; Separating crystals of sucrose from mother liquors, e.g. by washing in centrifuges; evaporating or boiling sugar juices

Extraction of sucrose from molasses
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Processes and apparatus of extracting sucrose from molasses, e.g. by precipitation, by osmosis

Drying sugar
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Processes and apparatus for elimination or water or other undesirable liquids from sugar

Cutting machines specially adapted for sugar
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Machines specially adapted to cut sugar, i.e. to penetrate sugar with an edged instrument.

Machines combining cutting, sorting and packing are classified in C13B 45/02

Sugar products, e.g. powdered, lump or liquid sugar; Working-up of sugar (C13B 40/00, C13B 45/00 take precedence; confectionery A23G 3/00)
Definition statement
This subclass/group covers:

Powdered, lump or liquid sugar

Working-up of sugar

Relationship between large subject matter areas

C13B 50/00 concerns sugar end product and the use of this sugar end product is classified for example in A23G 3/00.

References relevant to classification in this group
This subclass/group does not cover:
Processes and apparatus for drying sugar
Cutting machines specially adapted for sugar
Sweetmeats, Confectionery
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Last Modified: 10/11/2013