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WIPO CRNR/DC/6 ORIGINAL: English DATE: August 30, 1996


Notes on Article 2

2.01 Article 2 contains definitions of the key terms used in the proposed Treaty.

2.02 Item (i) defines the term "database". The term should be understood to include collections of literary, musical or audiovisual works or any other kind of works, or collections of other materials such as texts, sounds, images, numbers, facts, or data representing any other matter or substance. It is worth pointing out that in addition to many kinds of works and other information materials, databases may contain collections of expressions of folklore.

2.03 In a database, the works or other materials are systematically or methodically arranged, and each of these works or other materials can be individually accessed by electronic or other means. It is not necessary that the materials in a database be stored physically in an organized manner. The arrangement of the materials may be laid down in the addresses and indexes of the material that make it possible to directly access any of the materials in a systematic or methodical way. The requirement that the contents of a database be independent works, data or other materials, and that items in the database are individually accessible excludes any recording of an audiovisual, cinematographic, literary or musical work as such from the definition of a database and the protection of this proposed Treaty.

2.04 The term "collection" has been used in the definition of the term "database", whereas the term "compilation" is used in Article 10.2 of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Including Trade in Counterfeit Goods (hereinafter referred to in these Notes as the TRIPS Agreement) concerning copyright protection for databases. The term "collections" has been used in Article 2(5) of the Berne Convention, defining the copyright protection available for collections of works, and in Article 5 of the draft "Treaty on Certain Questions Concerning the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works". It is not intended that the proposed Treaty make any distinction between the two terms; rather, the proposed Treaty, compared to the Berne Convention, adds certain conditions for protection and removes others.

2.05 Item (ii) defines the term "extraction" as meaning the permanent or temporary transfer of all or a substantial part of the contents of a database to another medium by any means or in any form. The act of extraction is the transfer of some material to another medium; the original material on the medium in which the database is embodied remains on that medium. In this sense, the term "extraction" is a synonym for "copying" or "reproduction". The expression "another medium" does not refer to any particular medium. Transfer to the same type or any other type of medium, device, instrument or contrivance capable of recording the transferred material, is a transfer within the meaning of this provision. Reference in the provision to "any means" or "any form" is meant to cover all means and forms now known or later developed.

2.06 According to item (iii) , the "maker of the database" means the natural or legal person or persons with control and responsibility for the undertaking of a substantial investment in making a database. The expression "control and responsibility for the undertaking of a substantial investment" is intended to exclude the possibility that the protection of the proposed Treaty might flow to the employees who execute the tasks required to produce a database; it is clear that the rights and protection flow to their employer, be it a company, enterprise or other organization, which makes the investment. Likewise, the definition excludes subcontractors who may be commissioned to execute such tasks. In the same way that the term "author" in the Berne Convention applies to the successors in title of the author, the term "maker of a database" applies to the successors in title of the maker of a database. The successors in title of the maker of a database enjoy the full protection of the proposed Treaty.

2.07 Item (iv) defines the term "substantial investment". The investment may be in human, financial, technical or other resources essential to the production of a database. The human resources may, in addition to the "sweat of the brow", consist of the contribution of ideas, innovation and efforts that add to the quality of the product. The protection of a database does not, however, depend upon innovation or quality; mere investment is sufficient. The fact that the main requirement for protection is investment does not, however, reduce the value of the proposed system of protection since it also encourages innovation as well as industrious efforts in the production of databases. The investment must be sufficient, or "substantial", to qualify the database for protection. The substantiality requirement has been characterized in the expression "qualitatively or quantitatively significant"; this expression should be understood to mean qualitatively, quantitatively or both together. The measurement of significance must be based on objective criteria. In any dispute, it is the burden of the maker of the database to demonstrate the necessary investment.

2.08 The activities listed in Article 1(1) that may comprise the investment are the collection, assembly, verification, organization or presentation of the contents of the database. In practice, these are the steps in the production of a database that are most likely to involve substantial investments. A substantial investment in any one of the listed activities will fulfil the requirements for protection. It is recognized that "collection" and "assembly" are often interlinked, and "organization" and "presentation" of the contents may take place simultaneously. Any subsequent verification or re-verification is considered to be "verification" in the sense of Article 1(1).

2.09 Item (v) defines the term "substantial part". The substantiality of any portion of the database is assessed against the value of the database. This assessment should evaluate the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the portion, although neither aspect is more important than the other. As noted in connection with item (iv), "qualitatively or quantitatively" must be understood to mean either or both together. The value of the database refers to its commercial value. This value consists on one hand of direct investments made in the database and on the other hand of the market value or expected market value of the database. This assessment may also take into account the diminution in market value that may result from the use of the portion, including the added risk that the investment in the database will not be recoverable. It may even include an assessment of whether a new product using the portion could serve as a commercial substitute for the original, diminishing the market for the original.

2.10 According to item (v), "substantial part" means any portion of the database, "including an accumulation of small portions". In practice, repeated or systematic use of small portions of the contents of a database may have the same effect as extraction or utilization of a large, or substantial, part of the contents of the database. This construction is intended to ensure the effective functioning of the right and to avoid misappropriation. 2.11 In item (vi) a definition is provided for the term "utilization". Utilization is a broad concept that covers all forms of making a database or its contents available to the public. It comprises both tangible and intangible dissemination and diffusion, including the distribution of physical copies and all forms of transmission by wire or wireless means. Utilization covers the making of a database available to the public by both on-line and "local" means; it encompasses interactive on-line, on-demand operations where members of the public have access to the database at a place and at a time individually chosen by them, and it encompasses such local means as showing, "playing", demonstrating or otherwise making the contents of a database (such as a CD-ROM) perceptible to the public, even when no transmission is involved. Broadcasting and cable transmissions, whether subscription-based or not, may also be utilization of a database.

2.12 The term "public" has been used in the provision. The purpose for this is to make a distinction between relevant utilization and non-relevant communication between private parties. Utilization includes making available to the public by any means. No list of examples can be exhaustive. The expression "any means" includes all means now known or later developed. A database may be made available to the public even in the absence of any direct or indirect commercial advantage or financial gain.

[End of Notes on Article 2]


Article 2

Definitions

For the purposes of this Treaty:

(i) "database" means a collection of independent works, data or other materials arranged in a systematic or methodical way and capable of being individually accessed by electronic or other means;

(ii) "extraction" means the permanent or temporary transfer of all or a substantial part of the contents of a database to another medium by any means or in any form;

(iii) "maker of the database" means the natural or legal person or persons with control and responsibility for the undertaking of a substantial investment in making a database;

(iv) "substantial investment" means any qualitatively or quantitatively significant investment of human, financial, technical or other resources in the collection, assembly, verification, organization or presentation of the contents of the database;

(v) "substantial part", in reference to the contents of a database, means any portion of the database, including an accumulation of small portions, that is of qualitative or quantitative significance to the value of the database;

(vi) "utilization" means the making available to the public of all or a substantial part of the contents of a database by any means, including by the distribution of copies, by renting, or by on-line or other forms of transmission, including making the same available to the public at a place and at a time individually chosen by each member of the public.

[End of Article 2]


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